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Any reasons NOT to cut the oil barrel?

 
Posts: 76
Location: 48°N in Normandie, France. USDA 8-9 Koppen Cfb
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Hi All,

We're servicing our RMH (built 2015) I want to access the inside of the barrel to check for ash build up and to see whether the inside of the top of the barrel is OK.

I dont want to destroy the manifold to get it out, so, my question is: Is there any good reason not to just cut the barrel at the 2/3 line and leave the bottom 1/3 in place?

I propose to cut off at the black line and then when the top is back on, finish the cob to approximately where the cord is.

Does anyone have any experience of doing this, or any thoughts on why I shouldn't do it?!

Many thanks

Lesley

btw, the whole thing looks dire as I'm changing the finish at the same time - added curvy bits are great to look at, but they are a b# to keep clean! This third manifestation will be more angular and streamlined.


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gardener
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Is there already a seam where it looks like there is some gasket cord around the barrel, or was that pushed down between the metal and the cob earlier? Cutting the barrel could leave a not-perfect edge, which when you try to seal it might expand/contract differently, or warp and make it really tough to properly seal it again. My pile of bricks on the back porch has 2 barrels next to it, one that will be cut to fit over the burn tunnel snugly, and provide a nice lip for the second barrel to sit on, so it's easier to remove it and use a combo of the gasket rope and a clamp.
 
pollinator
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Lesley,   Not quite sure how your going to cut the side against the wall? I would think with all the rattling and vibrations that a saw or grinder would make that it may cause cracking which could lead to  potential leaks too. Is your barrel that far buried that you can't just chip away the cob (I'm assuming) to free it? If you can, the barrels rim would make a much more preferable surface to use as a seal.
 
gardener
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Lesley. If you can scrounge or buy some thick steel 1/2 inch or thereabouts. It could be interesting to cut just the top, leaving a lip of one inch or so. Onto which you would put a gasket afterwards. And lay the thick steel plate atop. Obviously cut to the right shape for the top of the barrel. Or you could find yourself a barrel lid and clamp.
 
pollinator
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I like Max’s idea, I did something similar with mine.
I cut out the top of the barrel but left 1.3” around the inside of the barrel flange, I then cut mutable slits all around so I  could bend up the metal to form a channel all around the top. I then dropped in a 3/4” length of oven door rope and sat a 1/4” steel plate on top of the fire rope.
I don’t have any phots as I changed the system soon after but I can give more info if required.
 
lesley verbrugge
Posts: 76
Location: 48°N in Normandie, France. USDA 8-9 Koppen Cfb
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Mark, Gerry, Antone, Thank you for posting

Is there already a seam where it looks like there is some gasket cord around the barrel

No seam, and yes, the gasket was pushed down between the metal and the cob

Cutting the barrel could leave a not-perfect edge, which when you try to seal it might expand/contract differently, or warp and make it really tough to properly seal it again.

Hmm, that was my worry.

one that will be cut to fit over the burn tunnel snugly, and provide a nice lip for the second barrel to sit on, so it's easier to remove it and use a combo of the gasket rope and a clamp.

This would be my first choice, I've found barrels with clamps but so far I can't clamp two of them together. Plus, I'd need to extend the chimney and insulation - which means changing the position of the exhaust conduit. Plus, can I just increase the chimney height? (I need to research that one!) and I'd need to remove the existing barrel.

Is your barrel that far buried that you can't just chip away the cob (I'm assuming) to free it?

I was looking for a way to avoid destroying the manifold. I rather think there's no choice. I knew this would be an issue when we built it, but was (over)confident at the time that my magic wand, or the permie rmh maestros would magic up a painless solution ;o)  I found it difficult to construct the manifold and to get it to connect to the barrel - so I tabbed the barrel opening. Image below.

It could be interesting to cut just the top, leaving a lip of one inch or so. Onto which you would put a gasket afterwards. And lay the thick steel plate atop.

Antone cheri, je vous aime mais je connais mes limites.

Or you could find yourself a barrel lid and clamp.


I've found two barrels, with lids and clamps - the lid doesn't fit the existing barrel, and only one manufacturer has so far replied with a no, their sizes dont fit my barrel.

Oh b# it, whatever we finally decide to do I think I'm going to have to remove the barrel anyway and do some searches in the fora to find out whether I can increase the chimney height, before I ask any more questions!

Thanks again, I really appreciate your help guys
Lesley
 
lesley verbrugge
Posts: 76
Location: 48°N in Normandie, France. USDA 8-9 Koppen Cfb
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Thank you James, you just cheered me up! You made Max (Antone?) 's  idea suddenly sound doable!

Fox James wrote:I cut out the top of the barrel but left 1.3” around the inside of the barrel flange, I then cut mutable slits all around so I  could bend up the metal to form a channel all around the top. I then dropped in a 3/4” length of oven door rope and sat a 1/4” steel plate on top of the fire rope.


This sounds a lot less work than the alternative.
"Mutable slits" as in variable?
Did any issues with exhaust escape, or warping appear before you changed?
Regards
Lesley
 
Satamax Antone
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I think he meant multiple slits.
 
Fox James
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Yes I had some warping of the top but I found a way around that issue.
I found out that by using two plates, the top would slightly  concave rather than twist so the seal stayed good.
If you used a thicker plate this might not happen but for me 12mm steel was very expensive.

I still use a similar system but I added a ring of refectory concrete and a much larger plate, this is because I use my stove primarily for cooking and the outer edges are now a very useful area.
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lesley verbrugge
Posts: 76
Location: 48°N in Normandie, France. USDA 8-9 Koppen Cfb
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Thank you so much for posting the drawings -and your stove is a delight! (btw is it James or is it Fox? apologies if I got it wrong)

You've given me food for thought and I appreciate it.

It's really tempting to just cut open the top, but as we're making a lot of cosmetic changes (and, finally, finishing the bench) it doesn't make sense to break out the barrel in the future. (we're not getting any younger!) If we can join two barrels with the clips we have, we'll use 1/3 set in and a full barrel on top. We'd like the ease of maintenance/inspection that offers us. Once it's all repaired and going ok, we'll look at getting a plate made for the top. That's the theory. I'll post pictures of what actually happens!

Thanks again

Lesley
 
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