• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Pearl Sutton
  • Mike Haasl
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Dave Burton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Ash Jackson
  • Kate Downham

What is my Lion's Mane totem doing?

 
pollinator
Posts: 268
Location: Mason Cty, WA
33
hugelkultur forest garden fungi trees books earthworks cooking composting toilet food preservation writing homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
...and what should I do about it?

Inoculated on Maple cut in March, this lion's mane totem was processed according to field and forest's instructions and using their spawn. It was cut accordingly, sandwiched with sawdust spawn, and wrapped up in a garbage bag until now. Something definitely is going on in there, and what must be mycelium, unless it's mold. It's a mystery to me how mushrooms could propagate in such airless conditions .

Now that something has thoroughly colonized it, should the bag be removed? The rainy season is here and if this is lion's mane, it will be very excited.
0930191602b.jpg
Inoculated with lion's mane
Inoculated with lion's mane
0930191602a.jpg
Inoculated with lion's mane
Inoculated with lion's mane
0930191602.jpg
Inoculated with lion's mane
Inoculated with lion's mane
 
steward & bricolagier
Posts: 6123
Location: SW Missouri
2720
goat cat fungi books chicken earthworks food preservation cooking building homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm not an expert, but I'd take the bag off it, something has colonized it, whatever it is can't be changed or removed, and it would like the rain. Hope it's lion's mane!! Uncovering it will let you find out what you have.
:D
 
pollinator
Posts: 636
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
90
fish fungi foraging bee building medical herbs
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It could be what you inoculated the log with. I have only grown Lion's Mane on sawdust blocks in a humidity chamber.  It looks like it took off and colonized well.  The outside may just be surface colonization but the end of the log is a good indication it is getting into the while log.
I did similar sized logs with Shiitake and Oyster and it was a couple of years before I saw fruit. The larger the log the longer it takes and the longer it will provide fruit.  
I was about to give up on my logs but decided to wait till the next spring and now I have a constant winter supply of Shiitake and I found I can get fall and spring oyster in the woods about 3 miles from where I live.
 
Fredy Perlman
pollinator
Posts: 268
Location: Mason Cty, WA
33
hugelkultur forest garden fungi trees books earthworks cooking composting toilet food preservation writing homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks folks, I figured what was done was done and unbagged it for the fall rains. All my logs are colonized, but it's still hard to tell by what..like I'm hoping the nubs on the reishi logs are not turkey tail.

I'll post positive results here!
 
Dennis Bangham
pollinator
Posts: 636
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
90
fish fungi foraging bee building medical herbs
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Turkey Tail is a good medicinal mushroom like Reishi. Of course I can find them almost anywhere around where I live.  
 
Fredy Perlman
pollinator
Posts: 268
Location: Mason Cty, WA
33
hugelkultur forest garden fungi trees books earthworks cooking composting toilet food preservation writing homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sure they are Dennis, and the healthiest chewing gum on a log! They're welcome anywhere outside of my stacking yard.
 
gardener
Posts: 6673
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1323
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hau Fredy, that is mycelium you are seeing, you can take the bag off since I see mycelium has occupied both ends of the log, the top appears in the photos to be lion's mane mycelium (note how the top is thickening, that is a fruit starting to form the base).

The best lion's mane take about 3 weeks to grow once a fruit has started putting out the first string formations.
Lion's mane is a great fungi, once it starts establishing mycelial threads it puts out two toxins that only effect other strains of fungi, thus preventing them from stealing the lion's mane food supply.
The enzymes this fungus puts off to deteriorate the lignin and other portions of the tree so it can take them in for food processing.

That log looks really good for getting some fruits. (Lion's mane typically puts off one fruit per year for two or three years.\
You can inoculate a new log by placing it in contact with the current mycelium loaded log, the fungi will spread to the new one.
To prevent other strains from "Infecting" your log, use cheese wax to seal the cut ends except where you put the two (new log against old log) in contact.

Redhawk
 
Fredy Perlman
pollinator
Posts: 268
Location: Mason Cty, WA
33
hugelkultur forest garden fungi trees books earthworks cooking composting toilet food preservation writing homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The bag's been off for a few weeks now, and the surface mycelium has vanished! It might be the cold, or the drying effect of exposure, because although it's raining periodically the totem is under a large cedar that wicks most, if not all, of the rain off its drip line. The humidity is still 90-100% per day, every night there is heavy dew, and the totem is completely shaded...I might move it to a slightly wetter and less shaded side of that sheltering cedar.

I didn't know most of that about lion's mane! Come late winter I will cut some fresh maple and place it adjacent to this totem then!

I sealed the ends of my stacking logs with beeswax (now I see why cheesewax is used...beeswax is harder to work, more expensive, and more appealing to rodents who have already chewed off shavings), but not the totem. Is sealing totems a good idea as well? I thought the plastic bag kept the culture relatively isolated until it had established.
 
Dennis Bangham
pollinator
Posts: 636
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
90
fish fungi foraging bee building medical herbs
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I just put a short log on top of the totem. Just want to minimize the exposure.

For me it is now Shiitake season since my varieties are cool and cold weather types.
 
Fredy Perlman
pollinator
Posts: 268
Location: Mason Cty, WA
33
hugelkultur forest garden fungi trees books earthworks cooking composting toilet food preservation writing homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dennis, a short log like the hat my totem has on? Under that is sandwiched spawn.
 
Dennis Bangham
pollinator
Posts: 636
Location: Huntsville Alabama (North Alabama), Zone 7B
90
fish fungi foraging bee building medical herbs
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes exactly.  I have seen some people cover the very top with plastic, The idea is to not let the log dry out.
I keep all my logs in a shade room and have a sprinkler system for dry spells.  I also put them on 12x12 inch pavers to keep the bugs down.  That is why I grow cold weather varieties (BUGs).

 
Bryant RedHawk
gardener
Posts: 6673
Location: Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
1323
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nothing wrong with using plastic bags, I just like to keep as much plastic away from my land as possible, which is why I use cheese wax.

When surface mycelium seem to go away, they really haven't unless they died from some sort of exposure to super cold (frost for example) or they dry out.
 
Fredy Perlman
pollinator
Posts: 268
Location: Mason Cty, WA
33
hugelkultur forest garden fungi trees books earthworks cooking composting toilet food preservation writing homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Except in summer, we don't need to water logs here, we get 66" of rain annually and the humidity from Oct-May hovers near 100% most days. There's drenching dew/mist every night, so thick it blows along air currents visible on cameras, which don't work as well from it. In summer I put a fan-pattern area sprinkler in the stacking yard, it also hits a bed of Stropharia Winecap and some seaberries.

We did have a couple nights at 22-25 deg F, but the totem is sheltered under a huge cedar, so I doubt it was much impacted. Every day in the mushroom yard is interesting now.
 
What kind of corn soldier are you? And don't say "kernel" - that's only for this tiny ad:
Rocket Mass Heater Manual - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/8/rmhman
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic