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Rehydrating dried out bread

 
Posts: 72
Location: Edmonton Alberta
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I'm not sure if this has been touched on here before, so i thought i'd share.

A houseguest we are currently accomodating turned us on to this tidbit;

Simply scatter a few drops of water on a hard dried out peice of bread and stick it in the oven on a low setting. It will rehydrate quite nicely.
 
gardener
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Location: PNW Oregon
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I've got another solution.....

Put your bread in a plastic bag, if it's not already, and toss in a few apple peels.
Close the bag and leave for a few hours. Perfect every time, no heat required.

Also works great for hard crumbly cookies! And croutons that have gone to far.

I imagine it would work with potato peelings, as well as other peelings.
 
gardener
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Location: North Georgia / Appalachian mountains , Zone 7A
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garrett lacey wrote:I'm not sure if this has been touched on here before, so i thought i'd share.

A houseguest we are currently accomodating turned us on to this tidbit;

Simply scatter a few drops of water on a hard dried out peice of bread and stick it in the oven on a low setting. It will rehydrate quite nicely.



Put it in a microwave if you have one, takes only 10-15 seconds and uses a lot less power. Works for hard leftover pizza too.

 
pollinator
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Location: zone 7
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i like to use the dry bread itself as an ingredient. it has many uses. i run the bread through my bread crumber on my meat grinder and i have fresh bread crumbs for uses in salads, battering foods, even adding to the dough of fresh bread. nothing from a store compares to homemade bread crumbs from homemade garlic and rosemary bread. bread up some chopped chicken and fry or bake it. delicious and no need for seasoning.

so dry bread has uses too, but i wouldn't use store bread.
 
steward
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Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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Old home-made bread is valuable in itself, as Hubert mentions.
Garlic-bread is my "hmmm, it's pretty hard, but since the mould doesn't smell like mushrooms yet" go-to.
Italians know what's what when it comes to using bread. Throwing it out is basically sacrilege. One of my favourite salads is panzanella. All the ingredients will be in season soon here...
Spaghetti, garlic, olive oil and herbs, sprinkled with fried breadcrumbs is classic cucina povera or 'poor people's food'. All the variatons on this theme I've tried are delicious.
 
pollinator
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Location: Stevensville, MT
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And bread pudding
 
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