• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • r ranson
  • Joseph Lofthouse
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
  • Carla Burke
  • Leigh Tate
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Greg Martin
  • Jay Angler
  • Mike Barkley

Does anyone else save plants when they've overseeded a starting cell?

 
Posts: 7
Location: Eastern Shore, MD
1
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Every year I start tomatoes and I never feel confident enough to just sow one seed. So I remove all but the strongest seedlings and pop the rest in water for about a week. The hairs develop roots and you end up with a ton of extra plants.

This year I started 7 tomato plants, but now have over 20. I'm probably just going to give the extras away.

I'm also growing pepino melons for the first time and they re-rooted just as well.
IMG_20200322_171656076.jpg
Tomatoes
Tomatoes
IMG_20200322_171637810.jpg
Pepinos
Pepinos
 
pollinator
Posts: 270
Location: Italian Alps, Zone 8
131
hugelkultur duck forest garden fungi foraging chicken food preservation homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I like this idea. hadn't thought of doing this yet.
I'm always overseeding, but then just end up removing most of the sprouts. Saving them could be a nice idea.
Do you pull the sprouts out, roots and all, or do you just break of the top above the soil and plop that into water?
 
master gardener
Posts: 3216
Location: southern Illinois.
892
goat cat dog chicken composting toilet food preservation pig bee solar wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Yes.  I often transplant from my starting effort.  Yesterday, I moved some Basil and Oregano.  Overall, I have had good results.  There always seems to be an extra place  in the garden to add a plant..
 
Brandon McCarthy
Posts: 7
Location: Eastern Shore, MD
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

S. Bard wrote:do you just break of the top above the soil and plop that into water?



Yup! I use scissors and cut at the soil line. Some plants (like lettuce and basil) I just eat. But tomatoes are the only ones I've been able to reroot. I also managed to divide 4 borage who all sprouted in the same cell.

The bad part is, I didn't label these. So there are 3 different types (a red, green, and black). So if I give them away it's all a gamble.
 
steward
Posts: 5682
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
2256
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


I typically plant around 50 tomato seeds into a pot. Then after they germinate I dump them out, and transplant them into individual pots.

P3200018.JPG
transplanting tomato seedlings.
transplanting tomato seedlings.
 
Brandon McCarthy
Posts: 7
Location: Eastern Shore, MD
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Joseph, do you break the roots apart or cut at soil level?

Also, an honor to speak with you. I'm growing your astronomy domine corn this year. I was going to buy some seed packets off you, but thanks for turning me onto the experimental farm network via your website. I was upset to see some varieties not listed, but my yard is only so big anyway.
 
gardener
Posts: 868
Location: N. California
300
hugelkultur kids cat dog fungi trees books chicken cooking medical herbs ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm new to starting veggie seed indoors this year, but I grew extra with intent of sharing with my friends and family.  I't just pain silly, but I can't bare to yank out the little seedlings and chuck them. They are my babies now and I will care for them.
 
pollinator
Posts: 475
Location: Greybull WY north central WY zone 4 bordering on 3
112
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I move them earlier and don't mess with water as an intermediate stage.  At or before the first set of true leaves I move the plants right to new cells.  Simply gently pull the plant like it is a weed root and all, poke a hole in the soil in a new cell, poke the roots in the hole and firm the soil around it and water.  Loss rate is only about 5% typically and most of those because I accidentally break them off pulling them.  At that young age they transplant really well.  Usually I can't tell the ones moved from the rest from the growth rate.  At that early age it seems to have no noticeable effect.  PS I usually start 2 seeds per cell and move the spare plants to other cells.

 
pollinator
Posts: 655
Location: Montana
234
forest garden trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I tend to yank them out like weeds and then immediately replant in a new cell.

Like right now I have only space for eight trays under lights inside. Say maybe 5 weeks from now I'll be out in the greenhouse with lots of space. Some important tomato seeds got their own cell. Seeds I grew myself got kind of sprinkled in heavily.

Another possibility I also like is just keeping the whole clump as if it were one multi headed plant.

Though not every plant has to be maximally productive for me as I am mostly just amateur tomato breeding and tend to have thousands of small tomato plants rather than a few really big plants.
gift
 
Justin Rhodes 45 minute video tour of wheaton labs basecamp
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic