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Most useful willow species?

 
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What willow species do you like and why?

I am planting a bunch of black locust seeds this year for future fence posts. I thought willows would be great to weave around these posts. What willow is good for this? I would also like to weave trellises, benders, ect.

I have always liked the look of pussywillow and weeping willow, but don't know much about their usefulness.

Thanks, Justin
 
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Certain pussywillows are very valuable pollinator forage early in the season. I know male french pussywillow are great for them. Others may be as well. Pussywillos should also have rooting hormone and medicinal properties just like other willows I would think. While probably not as valuable as some willows for weaving it is probably by no means poor.




 
Justin Gerardot
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Thanks. I didnt know that pussywillows attracted pollinators.  I thought they were all wind pollinated.
 
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Wind pollinated plants produce far more pollen than insect pollinated plants because so much just blows away on the wind and is wasted.  That's why pollinators like bees love them so much. They need pollen for protein as well as nectar for energy, so wind pollinated plants provide a ready supply of much needed protein.
 
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I like our native Black Willow, Salix nigra, because it is incredibly tough, being able to survive in both flood and drought conditions.
 
James Landreth
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Burra Maluca wrote:Wind pollinated plants produce far more pollen than insect pollinated plants because so much just blows away on the wind and is wasted.  That's why pollinators like bees love them so much. They need pollen for protein as well as nectar for energy, so wind pollinated plants provide a ready supply of much needed protein.




Thank you for explaining that! My friends and I were wondering these last few years why it is that wind pollinated plants still attract bees! We see it on our chestnuts and hazelnuts and didn't know why.
 
James Landreth
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Tyler Ludens wrote:I like our native Black Willow, Salix nigra, because it is incredibly tough, being able to survive in both flood and drought conditions.



I should really look into ordering some.

By the way, the garlic chives you sent me for church projects are thriving in the community food forests we planted!
 
Justin Gerardot
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I agree with James, thanks for the explanation Burra. It's funny that I now remember alot of bees in the pussywillow I liked to climb as a kid.
 
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