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LTO - Lithium titanate batteries for off-grid?

 
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I recently discovered this battery technology while looking here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_commercial_battery_types

Lithium titanate batteries are said to be long-lived, deep-charging and affordable.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium-titanate_battery

Have you used them or heard about them? What have you heard?

Brian
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This is really cool info, where would someone go to get some and what is the price per KWH, hopefully around $600, like LiFePO4
 
Brian Cady
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S Bengi wrote:This is really cool info, where would someone go to get some and what is the price per KWH, hopefully around $600, like LiFePO4



I've seen ~$766/KWhr at https://www.ebay.com/str/DIY-Off-Grid?_trksid=p2047675.l2563
This guy has been helpful to me answering questions.

Then there's Alibaba's https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/2-3V-66160H-Lithium-Titanate-Yinlong_62195304310.html?spm=a2700.7724857.normalList.16.6fe1cb22we1OFL
At about $320/KWhr, plus delivery and delay and risk of shipping from overseas, quality questions, etc.

I just googled these - Maybe you can find more.

Brian
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Brian,

Very interesting.  These might make great batteries for an off grid system.  Long life, lots of charge-discharge cycles and deep cycling are all highly important to an off grid application.

Don’t try to compare these with Lithium ion batteries though as these two battery technologies are really two different beasts.  A lithium ion battery is extremely lightweight, very power/energy dense has a limited number of charge-discharge cycles and cannot be discharged past about 35% or it just dies.  A lithium ion battery excels in lightweight, mobile applications.  The lithium titanate batteries will shine in fixed applications that require lots of charges and deep discharges.  While not great for a car, lithium titanate would be great for a house or cabin.

Very exciting topic, thanks for posting.

Eric
 
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Well this is interesting.  They sound great BUT   40 amp hrs ?  You can't do much with that.  
Now 400 amp hrs would be useful in stationary off grid applications.
I have not searched beyond the links provided yet, but I will.  If they make this in large sizes I will be very interested.
 
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Thomas,

No, I don't think that 40 amp hours will suffice for any dwelling sized backup.  But if these are affordable, then a battery bank should be perfectly doable.  I guess we will have to see how these new batteries compare price-wise to AGM batteries which are presently the most affordable deep cycle batteries.

Eric
 
S Bengi
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2.6V x 40AH x 100 = 10410WH = 10.4kWH for $2500
 
Brian Cady
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S Bengi wrote:2.6V x 40AH x 100 = 10410WH = 10.4kWH for $2500



Bengi, LTO batteries are variously reported as 2.4 or 2.3 volts, but the guy at DIY Off Grid said that their most useful range is around 2 volts, so he recommends 23-24 in series for a 48 volt system.

So 2.0v x 40 Ahr = 80 Whr per cell x 24 = 1,920Whr/~$1,470 or 77 cents  a Whr, or $770/KWhr, if from  DIY Off Grid guy, right? Alibaba etc. lists others for less in China, especially for larger amounts.

Brian
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S Bengi
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You are correct its a range from 2.64V when full to 1.5V when empty, but the real range is 2.6V to 2.0V with an avg of 2.3V


Still this could make a pretty cool setup for $10,000 (minus solar credit)

Solar Panels $2,500 (4kW x 4Hr)

Charge Controller+Inverter Hybrid Device $2,500 (125A, 240V dc to 240V ac, 30KW)
https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/Hybrid-Inverter-With-MPPT-Solar-Charge_60447119682.html

Battery Bank $2,500 (9.2KWH aka 100cell, 25,000 cycles with full discharge)
https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/2-3V-66160H-Lithium-Titanate-Yinlong_62195304310.html?
Battery Management System $1,400 (108s)
https://www.alibaba.com/product-detail/108cells-72V-84V-96V-100V-120V_62103929554.html
 
S Bengi
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Now for the bad news.
Discharge Efficiency = 85%
Charge Efficiency = 95%

1000W = Input (Solar Panels are only 20% efficient under perfect conditions so the real input is 4000W)
800W = Solar Panel (80%)
760W = Charge Controller (95%)
722W = Battery Charge (95%)
614W = Battery Discharge (85%)
552W = Inverter (90%)
 
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