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They pulled all of the weeds!!!!

 
pollinator
Posts: 1454
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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My stint as a volunteer at our local museum garden has just come to an end.

I went by this morning to work on the tiny garden and someone had pulled up all of the weeds and clover – gone.
Nice tidy paths of bare dirt – just as sterile as it was before I started working on it last year.

Over that last three to four months I had started seeing earthworms, the carrots are growing in abundance, it produced a nice patch of mustard over the winter, the kale, corn, garlic and onions are doing well and the one tomato plant as a big one already – almost ready to pick. All of this with out irrigation.

I almost threw in the towel last month when I went out and found ‘Round Up’ rings around the fences (no wonder the peas didn’t do well) and around all of the buildings. So I can’t use their grass clippings. Instead I started carrying in compost. I brought in leaves and planted thick mats of clover. This morning all gone.

And, of course they are all Master Gardeners and members of various horticultural societies so nothing I can say has any value. I figured they would just see how well it produced and be swayed by that.

Even when you show people how easy it is to produce food they still want to make it hard. It is more important that it have neat and tidy paths of dirt. O.K., my rant is over. I have enough to worry about here at home.
 
Posts: 28
Location: Zone 6, Kentucky, high water table
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Oh dear!! I am so sorry to hear that, I would certainly be devastated.
 
steward
Posts: 7926
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Look at the bright side:

You now have more time to work on your own site, where your labor is better appreciated.

 
master pollinator
Posts: 11352
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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So sad.

 
Jeanine Gurley Jacildone
pollinator
Posts: 1454
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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Yes, the up side is that I now have more time to create new proj in my own space. I feel better now that I have harvested some potatoes, carrots and just started on the garlic, this afternoon.
 
steward
Posts: 5987
Location: Missoula, MT
1285
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So sorry to hear that Jeanine. Sometimes it feels like walking among zombies with all the senseless, hours and hours they spend "weeding" and pulling up, raking off fertility that they (sometimes) weakly attempt to replace with sterile, allelopathic beauty bark and clopyralid compost. Let alone the Round-Up!

I tried to convince my condo association that they were paying landscapers to haul off leaves (and weeds), and then (when they finally had money again and could cover the bare and barren soil left behind), paying them to bring in and spread less-than-adequate mulch in place of what would have been better and free. They couldn't see it. Sigh.

It really is strange that people don't see the fertility that is right in front them. Hopefully this will keep shifting.

And you are harvesting! It's amazing how early and what a long growing season you have, Jeanine.

 
Jocelyn Campbell
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I was reminded of this thread today.

My landlord "helped" by removing my spent sunchoke stalks. Took them away to dump elsewhere. They were in a container of mine she let me put in one of her flower beds for better sun exposure. She also removed the volunteer squash I had tended there this summer. No word on whether she even tried the hubbard-squash-looking fruit it was producing (albeit small and late).

I missed her by just an hour. I was gone at a meeting this morning and came home to chop-and-drop the sunchoke stalks to cover and protect the roots this winter. Dang.

At least she didn't "help" my patio pots. I was able to chop-and-drop all the spent plants in and on those. Whew.
 
The only taste of success some people get is to take a bite out of you. Or this tiny ad:
Dave Burton's Boot Adventures at Wheaton Labs and Basecamp
https://permies.com/t/119676/permaculture-projects/Dave-Burton-Boot-Adventures-Wheaton
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