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What can I use chokeberries for?

 
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I found a huge patch of what I think are chokeberries.  Because they're red and I wasn't sure what they were, I didn't pick any.  If I can find a good use for them, I'll harvest them.  Don't want to do so if I won't use them.  A little help, please.
choke.jpg
Pretty sure these are chokeberries. If I'm wrong, please correct me.
Pretty sure these are chokeberries. If I'm wrong, please correct me.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 3105
Location: Officially Zone 7b, according to personal obsevations I live in 7a, SW Tennessee
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I can't tell anything from your photo. Can you take some closer pictures for us? We need to be able to see if the leaves are exactly opposite on the stem, or alternate. A close up of the leaf that shows the pattern of the leaf edge and veins are also helpful. Sometimes a picture that shows the cross section of fruit and seed shape.

 
steward
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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First thing I do with unknown berries is:

Pick one
Feel it's texture
break it open (seeds or pit?)
smell it
touch it to my toungue

The sum of those traits can really help me identify the plant, or at least get closer to a family name.

Things like thorns, leaf shape/color/size, plant habit can provide other clues.

 
pollinator
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Location: Saskatchewan
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Chokecherries, when ripe, are a dark enough purple that they look black. You might have pincherries there. Chokecherry and crabapple jelly is my favourite, pincherries would probably be good for that too. They would probably be good mushed and dried into fruit leather, although you would want to be sweetening them somehow.
 
pollinator
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Location: Zone 8b Portland
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I made wine out of them. It was quite good!
 
pollinator
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Location: Bothell, WA - USA
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A closeup picture would help - from far away they look like rose hips..
 
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