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Does Chinese privet fix nitrogen?

 
pollinator
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I've seen yes and no on the net.  What say ye?
 
gardener
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I’ve never heard that they do but unsure. If you cut them in the fall they make a dandy tomato stake come spring though. After they rot I use them as mulch. I’m experimenting with control as well. When you cut the mother plant a bunch of saplings pop up all around it. I feel like if it continues to expend energy making new trees it will eventually die. I also let the saplings dry then use as mulch. I’m going to experiment with growing oyster mushrooms in live plants next spring. I will strip off the bark to weaken it prior to inoculation.
So there you go. You didn’t get an answer to your question but you know stuff you never ask for! Sorry, I get excited. 😂😂😂
 
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Gray, it would have to be a legume to be a nitrogen fixer, which it isn't. I've not seen anywhere that says it is a nitrogen fixer, and I would be very interested in the rationale regarding that.
 
gardener
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there are some non-leguminous plants that are ‘supposed’ to be nitrogen-fixing, like goumi and other eleagnus species. chinese privet is admittedly not really closely related to them, either.
 
Leigh Tate
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You know, I seem to recall having read that somewhere. But I don't remember how or why it worked. Someone on Permies might know, though. I guess it would be best to not count on it, but consider any nitrogen fixed a bonus.
 
No prison can hold Chairface Chippendale. And on a totally different topic ... my stuff:
Greenhouse of the Future ebook - now free for a while
https://permies.com/goodies/greenhouse
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