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Looking for these for my gardening goals

 
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Hello whom this may concern!

I'm feeling the need to gather up what I can before anything happens that might inhibit the ability to obtain things. On a side note is anyone else feeling the urgency that something to the effect of a shtf scenario is not far around the corner?

Anyways looking to buy or trade for the following
zone 8-9 hardy species or varieties unless it's an annual species or whatever:

Peaches, nectarines, plums(wild types, grafted trees, mostly true to type varieties seedlings, etc)
Medlar
Salad burnet
Watercress
Common milkweed
Pansy flower
Horehound
White sage
Rhubarb
Artichoke
Cardoon
Egyptian spinach
Jicama
Boneset
Tomatillo(purple kind if possible)
Melothria pendula
Culantro
Lovage
Water caltrop
Good King Henry
Valerian
Rhodiola
Astraligus
Mullein
Various plantain herb species
Rattlesnake plantain
Grape Mahonia aka Oregon grape
Chinese toon leaf
Pistachio
Pomegranate varieties
Basswood aka liden tree
Oca and other Andean tuber crops
Tuberous nasturtium
Salsify
Queen Anne's lace or wild carrot
Yarrow
Rose of Sharon
Marshmallow
All-in-one almond
Pecans
Hazelnut
Chinquapin
Improved oaks for quality edible acorns
Quality opuntia fruiting varieties
Native pawpaw and/or good varieties
Cold hardy edible fruiting palms
The most cold hardy avocado types
Quality loquats
Fennel
Anise
Licorice
Hyssop
Anise hyssop
Skullcap
Lemon thyme
Lemon catnip
Lemon verbena
Sweet Cicely
American Chestnut
Cold hardy citrus
Che fruit
Japanese raisin tree
Apples/pears/Asian pears for this area(8b-ish)
White mulberry and other large fruiting sweet varities
Any quality nut trees not mentioned above(butternut, hickory, etc)
Perennial brassicas
Physalis peruviana seeds
Perennial and or wild edible alliums
Perennial, uncommon, culinary, annual, medicinal herbs
Heirloom, perennial, annual, landrace, open pollinated, non GMO veggies
Hybrid stone fruits such as aprium or plumcot
Hardy fruiting passifloras
Quality persimmon varieties
Roses for edible Rose hips production
Hawthorn
Cherries for this zone(want good quality types but also wild types)
Berries of all types including brambles, blueberries and relatives, gooseberry, solanum species, Juneberry, honeyberry, currants, highbush cranberry, aronia, elder, etc - basically any kind you think might grow well here)
Quince
Dioscorea edible species
Hardy tuber crops
Sweet potato varieties
Taro/malanga varieties
Sizable Pine nut types that might grow here
Vigorous squash or melon varieties(like Seminole pumpkin or vine peach)
Tupelo
Neem
Tea tree
Pollinator attractors(such as chaste tree, bottlebrush, etc)
Biomass and nutrition accumulaters
Exotic unusual hardy edible species of any classifications
True damiana
Black goji
Prolific native fruits of any sort with decent to good fruit quality
Plants that make strong dark natural dyes especially if the coloring is also food safe
Amaranth varieties
Jobs tears
Non GMO grain corn varieties
Prolific peppers hot or not hot
Heat tolerant slow bolt lettuce varieties
Veggies that can be grown in the zone 8ish area that are hardy enough to not be effected by direct frosts
Water celery
Fish mint
Other aquatic edibles veggie or herb
Edible fiddlehead ferns that may grow here
Mayhaw
True Wasabi
Horseradish
Chicory
Burdock
Feverfew
Zinnias
Calendula
Edible varieties of often used for ornamental purposes such as day lily, begonias, pepperomia, dalhia, tiger lily, hostas, etc
Cold hardy guava family members
Cold hardy edible fruiting banana varieties
Hardy kiwi types
Muscadine or other disease resistant grape varieties
Southern sugar maple (Acer barbatum var. floridanum)
Colonized edible/medicinal mushroom plugs
Might possibly buy dried edible/medicinal homegrown or wildcrafted herbs, fruits, tobacco(pesticides free), mushrooms etc make offers
Bitter variety calea zacatechichi
Other useful permaculture based plant species
Composting worms(really need to get this going)
Bitter melon preferably a large fruit type

This is by no means a complete list. This was all I could think of off the top of my head in a few mins. Make offers and also ask what I may have for trade. Will buy too as trades aren't totally necessary. What do you have that's cool, rare, edible, medicinal, useful, etc? Definitely make suggestions if you thought of something not listed here.

Thanks for your help!
 
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Posts: 364
Location: East tn
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hugelkultur foraging homestead
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Have a dozen plus of these. Am in e. Tn.

Trade for?
 
Posts: 84
Location: Middle Georgia, Zone 8B
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On a side note is anyone else feeling the urgency that something to the effect of a shtf scenario is not far around the corner?

Yup. Many of my social circle feel a weird crisis brewing as well. I'm praying we're all wrong, but...always be prepared, eh?

Cold hardy citrus

I think loquats or kumquats are our best bet. (I'm also in zone 8b.)

Apples/pears/Asian pears for this area(8b-ish)

Are you near a good nursery? If so, ask your local nursery owner what might be good, low-chill varieties. So far on my property, our apples are Crabapple and Golden Delicious. I'm hoping for Anna and Fuji soon. For pears, we have a Bartlett and a Keifer.

White mulberry and other large fruiting sweet varities

Any particular reason you prefer white? We have a native mulberry tree, still very young, already producing very tasty fruit.

Perennial brassicas

I bought a "perpetual spinach" from Baker Creek that I was very happy with. It only got very slightly tough and bitter during the hot summer. It's technically a chard.

Perennial and or wild edible alliums

Egyptian walking onions are doing well on my property. I'm not sure about how to properly ship small ones, though. If I can do some research and feel confident I can get some to you in good condition, I'll let you know.

Sweet potato varieties

This might sound weird, but I have the best success with staring slips from organic, store bought sweet potatoes. I had great success with Japanese yams. They slipped like crazy!

Veggies that can be grown in the zone 8ish area that are hardy enough to not be effected by direct frosts

 I have had good luck with Georgia collards and any variety of kale. They actually taste better after a good frost.

Muscadine or other disease resistant grape varieties

Do you have any that grow wild in your area? If so, consider taking a few cuttings? Or see if you can collect seeds?

Baker Creek and Seed Savers Exchange have many of the plants you listed available to buy as seed. I know Southern Exposure seed company specializes in varieties that prosper here in the South. They have an excellent catalog, although I've never ordered from them. Strictly Medicinal also offers several of the species you seek.
 
Posts: 17
Location: SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS, CA
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I love your wish list!  I’ve got quite a few of the things you’re looking for. I live in the Santa Cruz mountains, zone 9.

My passion is growing perennial veggies and medicinal herbs. Sounds like we share similar passions. Happy to trade.

I’ve got plant starts or divisions of:
Salad burnet
Horehound
White sage
Mullein
Yarrow
Fennel
Tons of perennial brassicas (I’ve been growing out Chris Homanic’s grex for the last 3 years and have a few awesome new varieties)
Caucasian spinach
Perpetual spinach
Longevity spinach
Okinawan spinach
York elderberry
Lemon balm
Feverfew
Self heal
Heritage raspberries
Chocolate mint
A large variety of runner beans
Cistus ladanifer
Merritt collard

I have most of the other medicinal herbs you’ve listed growing, but they need to expand a bit before dividing. 😊
 
Derrick Clausen
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Wow great replies! Didn't know anyone had replied until just yesterday when I got an email.

Will get back with detailed responses here soon!
 
Derrick Clausen
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J Davis wrote:Have a dozen plus of these. Am in e. Tn.

Trade for?



What you got? I'll give the names of my seller's accounts for eBay and Etsy that has most of what I have available. Anything I can think of not listed there I'll add to this thread eventually. My eBay seller name is "divineplants" and my wife's Etsy store name is "SixFlowersCrafts". Check it out and if there's anything you want hit me up!
 
Derrick Clausen
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Stacie Kim wrote:

On a side note is anyone else feeling the urgency that something to the effect of a shtf scenario is not far around the corner?

Yup. Many of my social circle feel a weird crisis brewing as well. I'm praying we're all wrong, but...always be prepared, eh?

Cold hardy citrus

I think loquats or kumquats are our best bet. (I'm also in zone 8b.)

Apples/pears/Asian pears for this area(8b-ish)

Are you near a good nursery? If so, ask your local nursery owner what might be good, low-chill varieties. So far on my property, our apples are Crabapple and Golden Delicious. I'm hoping for Anna and Fuji soon. For pears, we have a Bartlett and a Keifer.

White mulberry and other large fruiting sweet varities

Any particular reason you prefer white? We have a native mulberry tree, still very young, already producing very tasty fruit.

Perennial brassicas

I bought a "perpetual spinach" from Baker Creek that I was very happy with. It only got very slightly tough and bitter during the hot summer. It's technically a chard.

Perennial and or wild edible alliums

Egyptian walking onions are doing well on my property. I'm not sure about how to properly ship small ones, though. If I can do some research and feel confident I can get some to you in good condition, I'll let you know.

Sweet potato varieties

This might sound weird, but I have the best success with staring slips from organic, store bought sweet potatoes. I had great success with Japanese yams. They slipped like crazy!

Veggies that can be grown in the zone 8ish area that are hardy enough to not be effected by direct frosts

 I have had good luck with Georgia collards and any variety of kale. They actually taste better after a good frost.

Muscadine or other disease resistant grape varieties

Do you have any that grow wild in your area? If so, consider taking a few cuttings? Or see if you can collect seeds?

Baker Creek and Seed Savers Exchange have many of the plants you listed available to buy as seed. I know Southern Exposure seed company specializes in varieties that prosper here in the South. They have an excellent catalog, although I've never ordered from them. Strictly Medicinal also offers several of the species you seek.




Yes most certainly be prepared whether or not anything major happens! Better to have and not need than need and not have.

Just Fruits and Exotics is a good nursery near me that has the apples, pears, citrus etc for my area. However pretty pricy. I have grafting supplies and rootstock for many species so I can certainly try to do the work myself much cheaper than them. If I can trade for scions and successfully graft them then it'll likely be much cheaper than $50-100+ grafted trees. If I had more cash available I would just buy their trees as they are high quality and I like the people. Kiefer pear I'd certainly trade for some scions. It's one of the recommendations for this area. Anna apple is too.

With the mulberry I wanted white ones just because they are cool and more unusual. Also since I'm a online seller it's good future stock. Otherwise any good varieties are fine with me. There are native red mulberry all over around here and they are quite prolific for a wild fruit. There's a tree I'm gonna stop at and root some cuttings from here soon. Otherwise I have Japanese black and the long Pakistan mulberries here already. Have a good sized male mulberry in the front yard. I could graft a ton of varities onto that one otherwise non producing tree and have a cocktail mulberry tree right in my front yard.

I once had the perennial chard you speak of. It was a great producer. Unfortunately the full sun position I planted it in and super hot summers took them out eventually. Wouldn't mind trying them again in a lessly sunny spot and see if they can tolerate the summer that way.

Already growing the Egyptian walking onions. They do OK here but they die of if you don't split them up fairly regularly once they've formed a big clump. Nebuka evergreen onion does good here too and I highly recommend trying out that variety. There's wild walking onion all over around here(Allium canadense) and they are very prolific but seasonal. Can send some of those to whomever if anyone's interested.

Yes I have used store bought sweet potato varieties like Jewel or Garnet with good success. However I would like to source lessly common types and trial them for production to find the best varieties for here.

Collards do well here. They took some frost damage at around 28°F one night this year but otherwise survived it no problem. The dinosaur and green curly kales did not fare well with that temp. Was kinda shocked that it affected them so badly. Killed every last dinosaur kale and severely damaged the curly kales. Chard did not fare well either. Arugula and diakon did just fine with minimal damage. Right now I'm growing out many perennial brassicas that I bought from "Plant Abundance". They fared well with the cold but did take some leaf damage. Had some nine star perennial broccoli at one point but damping off and caterpillars took them out before getting big. Sucks that's a really cool plant. Will try and source more seeds for that eventually.

Many wild muscadine grapes here. Most of them have small fruits though they aren't bad. I do have a few quality types growing here already but sourcing more varieties will give me that much more to offer to others eventually.

I have ordered from Baker Creek and such before. Always good quality seeds. Definitely worth supporting them and the others but I like to attempt sourcing from individuals more. Helping each other out and supporting the littlest guy out there is my goal.

Thanks for your reply!
 
Derrick Clausen
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Christy Garner wrote:I love your wish list!  I’ve got quite a few of the things you’re looking for. I live in the Santa Cruz mountains, zone 9.

My passion is growing perennial veggies and medicinal herbs. Sounds like we share similar passions. Happy to trade.

I’ve got plant starts or divisions of:
Salad burnet
Horehound
White sage
Mullein
Yarrow
Fennel
Tons of perennial brassicas (I’ve been growing out Chris Homanic’s grex for the last 3 years and have a few awesome new varieties)
Caucasian spinach
Perpetual spinach
Longevity spinach
Okinawan spinach
York elderberry
Lemon balm
Feverfew
Self heal
Heritage raspberries
Chocolate mint
A large variety of runner beans
Cistus ladanifer
Merritt collard

I have most of the other medicinal herbs you’ve listed growing, but they need to expand a bit before dividing. 😊



Definitely interested in many of what you listed there. Have sourced a few of those plants already. If there's anything of mine you want by all means let's set up a trade!
gift
 
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