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Drywall on ceiling that's not completely level

 
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I'm finishing my basement and found out the ceiling is not completely level. Over a length of 14 ft the drop is 1 inch.

Wondering if I should fix this, or just put the drywall up. Maybe it won't be noticeable... Any suggestions?

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Daniel:

I wouldn't worry about it.  It might be noticeable to the sharp eye in a bare room, but one it has some furniture and a plant in the corner then it won't be bothersome - except to THAT person who does notice and you probably don't want them around anyway because they'll point out every other imperfection.

The alternative is to carefully rip a bunch of angled 2x2 to build up a wedge.  The wedge makes it easier to install the drywall because then you can just place screws anywhere.  You can also just place blocks every 12", but then you need to make sure all of the blocks are in the same plane and you have to be careful about where your drywall screws go.  I had to do the wedge thing on a floor... I'm glad I did b/c that was about 2.5" in 10'

I STRONGLY encourage you to rent a drywall lift.  Absolute magic.
 
pollinator
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Those lifts are fantastic, I bought one even for the few times I have used it.
Will you insulate the space first?
I agree Eliot, 1" is nothing to worry about.
 
Daniel Benjamins
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Thanks for the advice, I'm getting a lift/hoist for sure, already found a few options to buy or rent one. The basement is already insulated on al walls and ceiling.
 
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Daniel Benjamins wrote:I'm finishing my basement and found out the ceiling is not completely level. Over a length of 14 ft the drop is 1 inch.

Wondering if I should fix this, or just put the drywall up. Maybe it won't be noticeable... Any suggestions?



Those engineered trusses in the picture you provided sag over time, it's unavoidable and happens as they carry load and time passes. Once covered in sheetrock, mudded and painted, it is likely to be unnoticeable by anyone. Perhaps you may notice it because you already know it's there. If it really bothers you, tapered furring strips that resemble very long skinny pie slices can be screwed to the bottom of those trusses, one on each side of the sag from the center of the truss out to the wall, creating a flat surface to screw the sheetrock to.

I ditto the sheetrock lift for ease of installation overhead, especially if there is a large area to do. If there are two or more people are doing the work, in lieu of renting a lift you can make what's called a dead man. It is a length of 2x4, and another piece of 2x4 screwed together to make a T. The sheet is lifted into place, and the dead man (or two of them) are then wedged into place under the sheet thus holding it up allowing workers to then screw the sheet to the ceiling. See picture below.

If I may offer one suggestion, use screws instead of nails. Sheetrock nails over time will work their way back out and leave little bumps, and screws won't back out.


source

 
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I agree with James. Even if you were building a new house, a couple of years of settling would, most likely, unlevel your house.
 
pollinator
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The easier than wedges way is to buy metal studs and buy/rent a rotating laser level.  Screw the studs to the side of the joist or truss. That is how we fix ceilings that bridge different additions or remodels.

I would NOT mess with a 1 inch slope. If it is wavy, yes, but not a straight slope.  
 
Eliot Mason
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R Scott wrote:The easier than wedges way is to buy metal studs and buy/rent a rotating laser level.



EVERYTIME I think I'm finally smart someone comes along with a better idea!  This would be great in the field, but at the perimeter maybe not.  But yeah, much better than wedges.

I presume the metal stud to minimize weight?

 
R Scott
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The metal stud reduces weight for installation, making it possible for one guy to hold it level and screw it in place.  And carry all he needs for a room in one trip.  Almost impossible for one guy to do that with wood 2x4. Also easy to notch the stud to fit around any plumbing or electrical with just a snips.  They are also cheaper these days. As for greener, I don't know.  No mainstream building products are really very good.  

Side benefit is the metal stud acts as a resilient channel, so foot stomping doesn't transmit through the floor as loud.
 
Daniel Benjamins
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Thanks for all the advice, I will just leave it as it is. Although I was kind of worried, since my house is only 10 years old, it now makes sense regarding the sagging.

Tonight I picked up my new drywall lift. Someone here in town sold it to me, he only used it once for his own ceiling.

I have approximately 32 sheets of 8x4 to install for the whole basement and another 5 for the bathroom.

I'm not going to use nails, I bought a big box of 1-1/4 drywall screws. Probably need some longer ones for the 5/8 ceiling drywall, will have to find out about that.

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