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Fruit trees on southern slope

 
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Hello everyone, we are in the process of planning a little orchard
We will be doing about 3 apple trees, a peach and a nectarine. However, the best location is on a southern slope, so the soil will warm up earlier in the spring causing the tree to bloom early and be more susceptible to a late frost :/
I am in western KY (7a) so our winters aren't too extreme but it is pretty common for us to have an oddball late frost.
Any thoughts on whether this is a big enough concern to find a new location or if there is anything I could do to mitigate? Thanks
 
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Location: the mountains of western nc
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what kind of fruits are you hoping for? it may be enough to avoid fruits or specific varieties of fruit that are known to bloom early - i.e. probably not the best place for a major apricot planting, but persimmons should be fine...
 
Jt Glickman
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That makes sense, we are going for apples, peaches and nectarines
 
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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Peaches and nectarines often bloom to early here in Cincinnati.
How about shading the trunks?
I've been building leaf filled raised beds to feed nearby trees.
If you put these to the south of the tree, they would shade the trunk and roots.

The conventional answer is to paint the trunk.
 
Jt Glickman
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That is a good idea, I was wondering if shading that area would be enough, sounds like it might be worth a try
 
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