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Snapping turtles in pond

 
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So I'm a really nice pond but there seems to be turtles in it last year a few of our ducks were killed by turtles in the pond. I would like to find a way to catch the turtles and get them out of there so that the ducks can enjoy that part of their habitat without falling victim to the snappers at least I think they're snapping turtles they could be a different variety.would running a fishing line across the pond with various hooks going down into the water catch the turtles or do I need to come up with some type of underwater trap? We are going to try to eat the turtles that we catch so I don't want them to be dead on a line for long.
 
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They will bite virtually any bait fish will bite, with even more gusto! Raw meat is particularly good. There will likely need to be a steel leader or wire ahead of the hook because they can cut fishing line with their claws. They could likely survive several days on a line if left that long, but I would check lines at least daily.

They can also be trapped above water. The only trap legal here is a trap with a lever where the turtle's weight causes it to tilt and dump it in a box  where it can't crawl out. I just looked and there are several other types pictured online that look simple. Most are some kind of net/cage with large pvc pipe around the top which floats. Some kind of ramp lets them climb in, and I imagine the pvc is too slick for them to climb out.
 
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Jordan Holland wrote:They will bite virtually any bait fish will bite, with even more gusto! Raw meat is particularly good. There will likely need to be a steel leader or wire ahead of the hook because they can cut fishing line with their claws. They could likely survive several days on a line if left that long, but I would check lines at least daily.

They can also be trapped above water. The only trap legal here is a trap with a lever where the turtle's weight causes it to tilt and dump it in a box  where it can't crawl out. I just looked and there are several other types pictured online that look simple. Most are some kind of net/cage with large pvc pipe around the top which floats. Some kind of ramp lets them climb in, and I imagine the pvc is too slick for them to climb out.



There are probably as many ways to trap or catch turtles as there are cultures who love to eat them.  I've known guys who walk barefoot in the water, until the step on one, pin it down with a stick and pull it out.... not my idea of fun!  Bank lines are good, but trapping is far more humane. Check out my friend, The Meat Trapper on youtube.  He'll get you going in the right direction.  As Mollison said, "the problem is the solution."  Turtle is my absolute favorite meat and I sure wish I had your problem!
 
Judson Carroll
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oops, hit "quote" on the wrong post... but it will all make sense in context!
 
Gail Jardin
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Jordan Holland wrote:They will bite virtually any bait fish will bite, with even more gusto! Raw meat is particularly good. There will likely need to be a steel leader or wire ahead of the hook because they can cut fishing line with their claws. They could likely survive several days on a line if left that long, but I would check lines at least daily.

They can also be trapped above water. The only trap legal here is a trap with a lever where the turtle's weight causes it to tilt and dump it in a box  where it can't crawl out. I just looked and there are several other types pictured online that look simple. Most are some kind of net/cage with large pvc pipe around the top which floats. Some kind of ramp lets them climb in, and I imagine the pvc is too slick for them to climb out.



thanks for the tip about the steel leader I wasn't quite sure what it would be called or able to vision it in my mind but I figured something would have had to be put on the thin fishing line to make it secure enough for a snapper. where are you located I'm not quite sure what straps are legal here but I'll definitely check into that before trying to set traps for them.
 
Gail Jardin
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Judson Carroll wrote:

Jordan Holland wrote:They will bite virtually any bait fish will bite, with even more gusto! Raw meat is particularly good. There will likely need to be a steel leader or wire ahead of the hook because they can cut fishing line with their claws. They could likely survive several days on a line if left that long, but I would check lines at least daily.

They can also be trapped above water. The only trap legal here is a trap with a lever where the turtle's weight causes it to tilt and dump it in a box  where it can't crawl out. I just looked and there are several other types pictured online that look simple. Most are some kind of net/cage with large pvc pipe around the top which floats. Some kind of ramp lets them climb in, and I imagine the pvc is too slick for them to climb out.




I've eaten turtle a few times and thought it was absolutely delicious so I am looking forward to capturing them. I wish there were a way for them to live harmoniously in the pond with the ducks but I don't think that's going to pan out for the ducks best Fortune.
There are probably as many ways to trap or catch turtles as there are cultures who love to eat them.  I've known guys who walk barefoot in the water, until the step on one, pin it down with a stick and pull it out.... not my idea of fun!  Bank lines are good, but trapping is far more humane. Check out my friend, The Meat Trapper on youtube.  He'll get you going in the right direction.  As Mollison said, "the problem is the solution."  Turtle is my absolute favorite meat and I sure wish I had your problem!

 
Jordan Holland
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I'm in Kentucky; I'm sure the laws will vary. We also have Alligator Snapping turtles which are protected here. Many areas have laws regarding depradation that ease some restrictions, but there can be a requirement not to utilize the carcass. It can help to speak to local game enforcement "off the record". Many of them don't like to see animals go to waste, and are understanding as long as people act within reason.

If you've never handled snapping turtles, they are dangerous. They have very long, fast necks and can reach farther than expected. My grandmother got the worst cut of her life on a snapping turtle shell while dressing one.
 
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As Jordan said, double check that harvesting, or eating the turtles is legal. Assuming it is, grabbing them very swiftly on the shell, behind the head, and the rear of the shell, or tail is the best way to handle them.  Know that they can, depending on size, bite hard enough to sever a finger, so do be cautious.

I am wondering, though, have you ever SEEN these turtles IN your pond?  I'm curious how you determined the turtles were the predators and not birds of prey, otter, weasel or a host of other critters that are known to predate on pond swimming ducks, even large frogs will eat young ducks.  Just don't want you wasting your time hunting turtles that may not exist.
 
Jordan Holland
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Where I live, if there's a pond, there's turtles (and likely at least some of the snapping variety), lol! I've seen full grown ducks pulled underwater, and a few seconds later a large turtle head pop up close by. I haven't technically seen the actual act due to stained colored water, but I can't imagine any other predator in my area with that same MO, so I am pretty sure they could be a possibility.
 
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