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Plant ID

 
Posts: 112
Location: PA, zone 6a
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I have something that looks like a Lonicera species - wondering if its native or not. Its everywhere, if it isn't native I won't even try to rip it out.

The bees like the flowers, birds like the fruit.

One plant is in a rocky area by a pool - has smaller leaves - also growing like a round shrub, the other type is in the woods with larger leaves, somewhat different flowers, growing upright mostly. Could be two different species or just variants due to light  / soil conditions.

The smaller leaved type has red fruit, unsure about the wooded area type.

The wooded type is mostly growing upright, not really effecting native plants much. Nothing else is really growing in the rocky area, that type isn't a problem either.

I can go outside tomorrow and take an image of the rocky area type's center bark.

lonicerashrub.jpg
The Shrub Lonicera
The Shrub Lonicera
barkwoods.jpg
Bark of the Woodland Lonicera
Bark of the Woodland Lonicera
loniceraback.jpg
Left is the wooded area type, right is the rocky area type
Left is the wooded area type, right is the rocky area type
loniceraflower.jpg
Left is the wooded area type, right is the rocky area type
Left is the wooded area type, right is the rocky area type
 
pioneer
Posts: 154
Location: Michigan - Zone 6a
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If you look up Lonicera xylosteum, do the photos match what you've seen of this plant? If the plant itself is over 10 feet tall then it's probably not that, but it might be a start.
 
Garrett Schantz
Posts: 112
Location: PA, zone 6a
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The plants aren't that tall, flowers also look a bit different. It is a start though.
 
Garrett Schantz
Posts: 112
Location: PA, zone 6a
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Found a very large - treelike plant in the woods. Only noticed it due to the buzzing of bees above me. It is above the height of "sub-shrubs".

Again, not really much of any growth towards the bottom. Seems to prefer woodland edges / clearings or open areas.

I can post some younger bark plants if anybody wants to see those as well.
oldbark.jpg
[Thumbnail for oldbark.jpg]
20210514_113904.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20210514_113904.jpg]
 
Garrett Schantz
Posts: 112
Location: PA, zone 6a
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Here is an outwards look of the large plant. Some mature pine trees are next to it.
top.jpg
[Thumbnail for top.jpg]
 
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