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Make two loaves of bread - PEP BB food.sand.bread

BB Food Prep and Preservation - sand badge
 
gardener
Posts: 497
Location: Middle Georgia, Zone 8B
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This is my bread recipe:

Basic White Bread

Ingredients:
1 Tbsp. active dry yeast
1 tsp. salt
1/3 cup sugar (I used Turbinado)
1/2 cup neutral-tasting oil
2 cups non-chlorinated water
6+ cups all-purpose flour (or bread flour)

Method:
In a large bowl, combine all ingredients except flour. Then gradually add in flour, 1 or 2 cups at a time, until well blended. When dough becomes too stiff to stir with a spoon, add in remaining flour with hands.

Knead for 8 to 10 minutes, adding more flour if necessary, until dough is smooth, elastic, and doesn’t stick to your hands.

Place in a well-greased bowl and cover with a damp towel. Allow to rise in a warm (not hot) place for 45 to 60 minutes, or until dough is nearly doubled in size.

Remove from bowl. Cut dough into two equal pieces and form into two loaf shapes. Place into well-greased loaf pans. Cover with a damp cloth and allow to rise a second time, about 30 to 45 minutes.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Bake loaves in the center of the oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

Loaves are done when they are golden brown and sound hollow when you thump them. Remove from loaf pans to a cooling rack.

Allow to rest at least 1 hour before slicing them. This allows the centers of the loaves to firm up and not be “gummy.”

Variations:
Burger Buns: After the first rise, cut dough into 16 round portions and flatten slightly with your hand. Place onto a large cookie sheet. Allow to rise a second time, then bake at 375 degrees for about 15 to 20 minutes. If you find the buns getting too dark on the bottoms, try baking them on a higher rack inside the oven and turn upside down halfway through the bake time. Remove to cooling rack and let rest one hour before serving.

Hot Dog Buns: After the first rise, cut dough into 16 equal portions and roll into cylinder shapes. Continue as above for burger buns.

Dinner Rolls: After the first rise, cut dough into 20 equal portions and roll into balls. Place onto a large cookie sheet and continue as above for burger buns. Brush finished rolls with melted butter if desired.


Here are the photos:

0602210916a.jpg
Ingredients Being Mixed
Ingredients Being Mixed
0602210927.jpg
Dough Ready for First Rise
Dough Ready for First Rise
0602211018.jpg
Dough Ready for Second Rise
Dough Ready for Second Rise
0602211200.jpg
Finished Loaves
Finished Loaves
0602211343.jpg
Sliced Loaves
Sliced Loaves
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Mike Barkley approved this submission.

 
pollinator
Posts: 241
Location: Michigan - Zone 6a
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I used Paul's Polydough recipe, the first loaf is just the original recipe and the second loaf has some Everything Bagel seasoning mixed in and on top.

This is definitely something I'll be making again.
photo_2021-06-13_19-13-24.jpg
Ingredients being mixed
Ingredients being mixed
photo_2021-06-13_19-13-28.jpg
First loaf, risen
First loaf, risen
photo_2021-06-13_19-13-33.jpg
First loaf, finished
First loaf, finished
photo_2021-06-13_19-13-37.jpg
First loaf, sliced
First loaf, sliced
photo_2021-06-13_19-13-41.jpg
Second loaf, unrisen
Second loaf, unrisen
photo_2021-06-13_19-13-44.jpg
Second loaf, finished
Second loaf, finished
photo_2021-06-13_19-13-47.jpg
Second loaf, sliced
Second loaf, sliced
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Posts: 17
Location: California
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Bread Cooked in Cast Iron Dutch Oven and some random metal dutch oven thats not as thick as cast iron....
Here's the easiest beginner sourdough recipe from the Perfect Loaf! Maurizio has SO MANY AMAZING recipes with specialty flours, but AP flour is the most accesible for me. Sourdough AP Bread - The perfect loaf


20160910_133405.jpg
Sourdough Starter
Sourdough Starter
20160910_164406.jpg
Bread in the on counter proof phase
Bread in the on counter proof phase
20160911_094533.jpg
slice of a loaf
slice of a loaf
20160913_195846.jpg
Heres two loaves in "bulk fermentation" phase
Heres two loaves in "bulk fermentation" phase
20160914_084306.jpg
Olive loaf after I scored it
Olive loaf after I scored it
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[Thumbnail for 20160914_095020.jpg]
20160914_101937.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20160914_101937.jpg]
20160914_140622.jpg
Inside of olive loaf!
Inside of olive loaf!
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Note: looks yummy

 
Posts: 20
Location: Portland OR
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Made these loaves a few months ago and I haven't been documenting bread I have made recently, but hopefully this will do!
The base recipe for a sourdough bread I used from "The Perfect Loaf"

92g sourdough starter
460g white all purpose organic flour
340g warm water
9g salt

Mix together. Let rest for 30 minutes. Stretch and fold!. Wait another 30 minutes. Do this 3 times. Afterwords, let it rest for 2 hrs.
Shape loaf and let rest overnight in the fridge.

Cook in the morning. Preheat oven with dutch oven for 45 min. Put loaf in dutch oven and score it three times. 30 minutes at 475F with lid on.
20 minutes with lid off. Crust should look dark/golden. Remove and rest on the stove for an hour.

EAT!

I made a loaf with tumeric and walnuts, and the other one with beet powder for fun color. The beet color cooked out mostly and left a marbled pink color. I sadly don't have a photo of that loaf finished, But I do remember that it was delicious and sliced super easily.
IMG_0061.jpg
Mixing the loaves
Mixing the loaves
IMG_0065.jpg
Stretching and folding
Stretching and folding
IMG_0069.jpg
Mixing in the tumeric and walnuts
Mixing in the tumeric and walnuts
IMG_0181.jpg
Cooling in the dutch oven
Cooling in the dutch oven
IMG_0183.jpg
Almost ready to eat!
Almost ready to eat!
IMG_0187.jpg
Slicing the loaf
Slicing the loaf
IMG_9918.jpg
Pretty
Pretty
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Note: Well done!

 
pollinator
Posts: 210
Location: Midwestern USA
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Hello! I bake my own bread from a sourdough starter I created from wild-caught yeast last spring and have been successfully using for more than a year now. I've also written a 4-part series on "wild caught" sourdough for my blog, in which I cover:

1) why you should use this method to bake bread
2) how to capture wild yeast from sourdough
3) how to bake sourdough bread from a starter, and
4) how to make a pizza dough from sourdough starter.

This post is for the sand BB on baking two loaves of bread. I follow the methods outlined in Ed and Jean Wood's book, Classic Sourdoughs, with some adaptations likely due to climate and environment.

First, I needed to reactivate the culture. Here it is fresh from the fridge:


Reactivated culture:


Then the culture proof:


Kneading the dough:


Dough proof:


One finished loaf:


Another finished loaf:


Two different loaves side by side:


An image of still another loaf, this time cut so you can see the slice (behind the pizza). I made this one of stone-ground whole wheat flour and baked it in a cast iron skillet, hence the shape:

Thank you!

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Nicole Alderman approved this submission.
Note: I hereby certify that this badge bit is complete!

 
Posts: 10
Location: Pacific Northwest USA
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Hello! I was going through photos from last fall and realized that I did this. Made a series of whole wheat sourdough boules after joining an online class co-hosted by the WSU Bread Lab and Canlis.
Video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0E-4ckoMCWg
Recipe here: https://canlis.com/uploads/ClassNotes.pdf (starts on page 6).

Honestly, I found the recipe hard to follow. I've also struggled with homemade starter in the past and I think I made it hard on myself by going for 100% whole wheat. But they turned out OK! I plan to keep experimenting, maybe with a mix of white and whole grain, until I get a little more comfortable.

These photos are from one batch of 2 loaves. Only ingredients are flour, water, and salt (and wild yeast).
Making.png
Starter / Dough getting mixed
Starter / Dough getting mixed
Completed.png
2 completed loaves / View of center
2 completed loaves / View of center
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BBV price: 1
Note: Kate, we need to see slices of both loaves.

 
Posts: 6
Location: Lincoln, NE
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I'm quite fond of baking, so I took pictures of my weekly loaves :)  I mostly eyeball the ingredients so don't use a set recipe, but here's my best approximation:
1) activate the yeast in about half a cup in warm water, 2) add a generous pinch of sugar or honey (probably around 2 teaspoons), 3) add two cups of flour, 4) add a sprinkle of salt and a good glug or two of olive oil (very technical measurements, I know), 5) mix well, adding water or flower as needed to reach the right consistency.  Kneed it and let it rise and I have a nice dough!  I recently received a 'pan de mie' pan from my mom, so that's the pan I used for both loaves.


First loaf pre-mixing


First loaf fresh out of the pan


Slice of first loaf


Second loaf pre-mixing


Second loaf post-mixing


Slice of second loaf (a better rise meant it touched the top of the pan, which is intentional, but it sacrifices that pretty top...)
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gardener
Posts: 1480
Location: Hudson Valley, New York
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1) Recipe for sourdough

I follow the recipe on Tartine Bakery

It uses 200g of starter, 900g of King Arthur Organic Flour, 100g of sprouted organic wholewheat flour, 20g of salt, 750g of water.







2) Recipe for Pitta Bread

I use the following recipe with a few tweaks. I use wholewheat flour rather than plain white flour and I use 40g of maple syrup rather than caster sugar.







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Mike Barkley approved this submission.

 
pollinator
Posts: 349
Location: Pembrokeshire, UK
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We make sourdough bread regularly. In fact, we rarely buy bread any more, unless it is heavily reduced. Usually my partner makes it as she is much better at it than I am but, for the purposes of this BB (and self-development), I had a go.

I ended up making 3 loaves, one of which collapsed and I am not showing! I split the first mixture into 2 and baked one in a cast iron dish and one in the loaf tin. The one in the cast iron failed. I then made up another dough, a week or so later, and cooked that without splitting it in the cast iron. This one worked much better!

Recipe:

  • 600g organic flour, I used 50-50 white and wholemeal
  • 450g water, ideally filtered or no-chlorine. You can also use whey.
  • 2 tbsp sourdough starter
  • Big pinch of salt


  • 1. Weigh out the flour, add the salt and stir in the water. Once this has been mixed, add the sourdough starter (and don't forget to feed it again!).

    2. Kneed the dough a little to combine it, taking care not to rip it. Come back to the dough every hour or so and "stretch and fold". Do this a few times.

    3. Shape the loaf but tightening it. Pull the edges, gently, into the center to create a tight ball. Then turn it so the creases are face-down.

    4. Place the tight, shaped dough in a proving basket for 4 hours. I use a banneton but you can use a heavily-floured disk or even the tray you'll bake in.

    5. Heat the oven and, if you're using one, the cast iron pot in the oven at 250 C for 45 minutes.

    6. As quickly as possible (to avoid losing heat), put your dough into the oven (in the pot or on a tray), score it with a razor and then close the door. If using a pot, place the lid on, otherwise, a small tray of water helps keep the humidity high.

    7. After 20 minutes, remove the lid/tray of water and turn the temp down to 200 C.

    8. After another 10 minutes, remove the bread, turn out and allow to cool before cutting.
    flour.jpg
    Organic, stone-ground flour
    Organic, stone-ground flour
    600g-flour.jpg
    600g flour
    600g flour
    450g-water.jpg
    450g water
    450g water
    starter.jpg
    Sourdough starter
    Sourdough starter
    mixing-dough.jpg
    Ingredients getting mixed
    Ingredients getting mixed
    proving.jpg
    Proving in banneton basket
    Proving in banneton basket
    in-tray.jpg
    One loaf in a tray
    One loaf in a tray
    loaf-2.jpg
    Cooked loaf #1
    Cooked loaf #1
    loaf-slice-2.jpg
    Slice of cooked loaf #1
    Slice of cooked loaf #1
    loaf-1.jpg
    Cooked loaf #2 with slice
    Cooked loaf #2 with slice
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    Mike Barkley approved this submission.

     
    master pollinator
    Posts: 331
    Location: Carlton County, Minnesota, USA: 3b; Dfb; sandy loam; in the woods
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    I’m doing bread and pizza today. I liked the idea of Paul’s polydough but wanted to use sourdough starter in place of yeast so I mixed four cups of whole wheat flour with four cups of water, four cups of brown rice and all the starter that I would discard for today as a sponge. I mixed that up and let it sit for about 20 hours before mixing in some pepitas, about a teaspoon of salt, and enough all purpose flour to dry it out and get it stiff enough to work with. After dividing it into two loaves and ball for pizza, I let these sit and rise for several more hours and then baked them in a well-preheated cast iron pot at 425° F — 25 mins with lid and 25 more without. And now that I’ve tasted them, I think I used too little salt. They’re otherwise wonderful.
    61C60316-BFC0-499B-8714-669C41EFC2DD.jpeg
    Making the sponge.
    Making the sponge.
    7A609685-6D4B-4903-96B6-817A120F5BC1.jpeg
    Putting it up to rise.
    Putting it up to rise.
    E7C5546B-C2F8-4EA0-9F0C-C431DA859551.jpeg
    Baking in the controlled environment of lidded iron.
    Baking in the controlled environment of lidded iron.
    D6F7C110-D8F4-4136-A49C-F1AB0BC98D37.jpeg
    Two loaves.
    Two loaves.
    A8DD4627-FF0B-43EE-872C-E4BB3CBA65F8.jpeg
    Good crumb, no burn, easy slicing. You can see rice and nuts in there.
    Good crumb, no burn, easy slicing. You can see rice and nuts in there.
    Staff note (gir bot) :

    Mike Barkley approved this submission.

     
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