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Poly Dough - pizza, bread, fry bread, cinnamon rolls, etc.  RSS feed

 
paul wheaton
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I came across this little scrap of paper with the recipe.  Before putting it away I thought I would share it.

In a big bowl, put 4 cups of hot water, 1 tablespoon of salt, 2 teaspoons of yeast and a half cup of oil.  Mix.

Add in flour until it's doughy.  Knead.  Rise and punch down.

Put the big gob of dough in a gallon ziplock and put it all in the fridge.  Then tear off pieces as you need it. 

Pizza is the most obvious.  Just tear off a piece, shape it, smear tomato sauce on it.  Throw on pizza toppings and cheese, then bake at 450 for about eight minutes.

You can make a loaf of bread by ripping off about a third of the dough and plopping it into a bread pan.  Let it rise once more and then bake at 400 for about half an hour.

Fry bread:  get about a half cup of oil really hot in a pan and throw in a flatened handful of dough.    Fry, flip, fry and serve.

Cinnamon rolls:  Roll a big gob of dough flat.  Smear on melted butter, cinnamon, sugar and raisins.  Roll up.  Cut into chunks.  Lube with melted butter and bake for a half hour at 400 degrees.

The list goes on and on for all of the things you can do with the dough. 

Pigs in a blanket. 

Piroshkis.

Hamburger buns.



 
                      
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paul wheaton wrote:
I came across this little scrap of paper with the recipe.  Before putting it away I thought I would share it.

In a big bowl, put 4 cups of hot water, 1 tablespoon of salt, 2 teaspoons of yeast and a half cup of oil.  Mix.

Add in flour until it's doughy.  Knead.  Rise and punch down.

Put the big gob of dough in a gallon ziplock and put it all in the fridge.  Then tear off pieces as you need it. 

Pizza is the most obvious.  Just tear off a piece, shape it, smear tomato sauce on it.  Throw on pizza toppings and cheese, then bake at 450 for about eight minutes.

You can make a loaf of bread by ripping off about a third of the dough and plopping it into a bread pan.  Let it rise once more and then bake at 400 for about half an hour.

Fry bread:   get about a half cup of oil really hot in a pan and throw in a flatened handful of dough.    Fry, flip, fry and serve.

Cinnamon rolls:  Roll a big gob of dough flat.  Smear on melted butter, cinnamon, sugar and raisins.  Roll up.  Cut into chunks.  Lube with melted butter and bake for a half hour at 400 degrees.

The list goes on and on for all of the things you can do with the dough. 

Pigs in a blanket. 

Piroshkis.

Hamburger buns.






Paul,

About how much flour in cups or by weight (grams or ounces) do you add?

Related to your poly dough, have you heard of the "no-knead" method of bread (dough) making? You could easily adapt this to that.

Gary
 
                              
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Artisan bread in five minutes a day,    3cups water, 1 1/2  T yeast  11/2T salt  6 1/2 C flour stir and refrigerate, The recipe is online mother earth news a couple of issues ago.... no kneeding no fuss just tear, form and bake
 
paul wheaton
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I have no idea how much flour.  Maybe eight cups? 

It's been a long time since I made it.

 
Brenda Groth
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yeah i was going to mention the artisan bread recipe from mother earth too..fantastic..also if you go to motherearth on line they have lots of other bread recipes.
 
Leah Sattler
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I wonder if this would work with my favorite bread recipe? I tend to make the bread then put the extra (baked) in the freezer for later use to keep it fresh. but there is nothing like truly fresh from the oven bread.
 
paul wheaton
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Leah Sattler
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not yet! I plan to try it with my bread recipe. It contains oatmeal and whole wheat flour. it may not hold up as well due to the different characters of the ingredients. might get to it today but more likely tommorrow. and of course the results won't be available likely for a week...unless it is a total flop overnight! I especially would like to be able to have it ready for cinn rolls in the mornings.
 
Leah Sattler
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ok I tried it with my own bread recipe. I made my normal batch (two loaves worth) baked one loaf right away and put the other in the fridge for four days. I made cinnamon rolls/sticky buns with the fridge dough yesterday morning. It was ok. they didn't raise real well which was to be expected I think but it was acceptable. it had a distinct sour dough taste to it which would be ok if you liked the sour dough taste. I'm not particularly fond of it. my daughter wouldn't eat it even though it was covered in caramel. chickens got the leftovers.

 
paul wheaton
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When you make your regular bread, does it normally have a sourdough taste?

I remember when I was optimizing the polydough recipe, there were certain ingredients I had to avoid because they would not last very long.  I have to admit that I cannot remember what those were.

Try this recipe sometime and see if you like it better.



 
Leah Sattler
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my regular bread does not. I don't like sour dough. after my looking into it a bit, it sounds like the longer it is in the frig the more sour dough like it tastes so I think it is just part of the deal. which makes sense since that is how sour dough starter is maintained. it probably just slows the souring a bit. I have a recipe for overnight cinnamon, rolls it doesn't taste sour dough like at all. it is just cinnamon rolls that wait in the frig for the final rise in the morning. nothing special.

http://www.frugalupstate.com/2008/11/best-of-refrigerator-bread-2.html

I might try it with a more simple recipe. mine is

1 cup whole wheat flour
1 tb wheat gluten
1 cup white flour
5 tsp yeast
1 cup warm water
pinch of sugar

allow to get bubbly in the mixer while you prepare the remaining ingredients.

then add
1 1/2 cup pulverized oatmeal
1/4 cup coconut oil
1/2 cup brown sugar

add flour till it is a slightly wet dough (a few cups?). knead using oiled hands and work top. rise twice and bake. 24 rolls or two loaves.

 
Gwen Lynn
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...I'm salivating just looking reading about those rolls! 
 
Leah Sattler
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trust me they looked alot better then they tasted.
 
Gwen Lynn
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Yes, but I know you can make them right! Yummy!
 
paul wheaton
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BackHome mag has a mini review of a book called "kneadlessly simple" featuring a "cold-rise method".  I wonder if this might be the poly dough recipe, but with the rising in the fridge.  I know that when I did it, the bag would sometimes explode in the fridge. 

The review also mentions gluten free recipes ....

Anybody currently doing the polydough thing?  I wonder if you might try it without kneading it and instead let it sit in the fridge for a day unkneaded and see what happens.

 
Joel Hollingsworth
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I have not thought about dough the same way since reading this article:

http://www.ranprieur.com/misc/sourdough.html

Two tiny things I would add:

First, "depleted" starter is not useless as he says, but perfect for quickbread/soda bread.  If you have sourdough that is mature at all, use baking soda, not baking powder: cheaper, probably better for you.  The difference is some acid-forming chemicals in baking powder that are unnecessary in an already-acid dough.

Second, he says he's not comfortable letting his sourdough become tame.  I noticed that the Old Testament, strangely enough, seems to require a yearly renewal of everyone's sourdough starter as part of the holiday calendar.
 
Leah Sattler
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thats a great link.

I wonder if my recipe has too much sugar in it to use this way. pauls original recipe is as basic a recipe for bread as can be had. 
 
Brenda Groth
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printed this off and will try sometime and then let you know..i'm generally slow at new recipes..so it might take a while..but i love sourdough
 
paul wheaton
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Len Ovens
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4 to 4.5 cups of liquid.... about 32 oz. Bread should be 60 to 75% hydration (if you will knead it .. No-knead is 83%) so about 45oz of flour. It takes about 3/4 cup of flour to make 4oz... so 11 x 3/4 is about 8 cups. The salt seems a bit low, normally it would be about 2% or 3tsp. but with the added oil maybe not and the fridging of it may make a difference too. The rise time after you form it will be longer than you are used to because the dough is cold. Yeast lives half as fast (rises half as fast) if you drop the temp 17F. It should not be too sour because the yeast is also lower than normal. (standard french bread is 60,2,2... that is the flour is 100%, the water is 60%, the salt and yeast are both 2% - by weight) This may be why the sticky buns were sour using a normal bread recipe. No-knead bread for example uses 1/5 the normal yeast to offset the 12 to 18 hour primary ferment instead of 2hours normally used.

There are so many ways of doing the same thing   But for my tastes, longer ferments are better tasting (even if sour) and better for our body (starches are more ready to be used by our body). Also, in my opinion, wild yeast tastes better than bakers yeast (which is really a type of brewers yeast... grown on molasses rather than flour).
 
Jeanine Gurley Jacildone
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paul wheaton wrote:
Gonna be doing this a lot for the next couple of days.


What? Baking bread?  Will there be pictures?  A podcast about your making bread? 
 
                                      
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paul wheaton wrote:
I came across this little scrap of paper with the recipe.  Before putting it away I thought I would share it.

In a big bowl, put 4 cups of hot water, 1 tablespoon of salt, 2 teaspoons of yeast and a half cup of oil.  Mix.

Add in flour until it's doughy.  Knead.  Rise and punch down.

Put the big gob of dough in a gallon ziplock and put it all in the fridge.  Then tear off pieces as you need it. 

Pizza is the most obvious.  Just tear off a piece, shape it, smear tomato sauce on it.  Throw on pizza toppings and cheese, then bake at 450 for about eight minutes.

You can make a loaf of bread by ripping off about a third of the dough and plopping it into a bread pan.  Let it rise once more and then bake at 400 for about half an hour.

Fry bread:   get about a half cup of oil really hot in a pan and throw in a flatened handful of dough.    Fry, flip, fry and serve.

Cinnamon rolls:  Roll a big gob of dough flat.  Smear on melted butter, cinnamon, sugar and raisins.  Roll up.  Cut into chunks.  Lube with melted butter and bake for a half hour at 400 degrees.

The list goes on and on for all of the things you can do with the dough. 

Pigs in a blanket. 

Piroshkis.

Hamburger buns.






Wait...so this is poly dough? What's the difference between this and, um.......dough?
 
paul wheaton
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South Carolina wrote:
What? Baking bread?  Will there be pictures?  A podcast about your making bread? 


You make it and post pictures!

A podcast is coming with about five things in it and polydough is one of those things.

 
Tim Buckner
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When I heard the podcast about your brother Susan coming down and you talked about polydough, it sounded a lot like artisan bread douge recipe I found on Mother Earth News
Aritsan Bread in Five Minutes a Day.

Basically it's

3 cups of lukewarm water (~100 degrees F). Edit - Water too hot will kill the yeast.
1 1/2 Tbsp Kosher Salt
1 1/2 Tbsp Active Yeast
6 1/2 cups of AP Flour

Mix and allow to stand for 2-5 hours at room temperature in a pot with a lid that is not air tight [it will double in size so pick a big pot]. You can use it right away, but it is easier to work with if you let it sit in the fridge for 3 hours. It can sit in the fridge for up to 2 weeks while you take off portions to use for whatever you want. If you want a sourdough flavor, don't clean the pot when you make the next batch and it will take on more of a sourdough flavor each batch.

That's my thought processes on the subject.

Thank you for your time and energy,

Tim Buckner

Edit - Just realized I didn't go into how to make the bread, but just go to the post and read. A little bit too involved to go into when it's already outlined there.
 
Danny Boosten
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Hello permies

this is an easy recipe for frying pan pizza I have an oven and an outside wood fires pizza oven i used to use it a lot but it uses to much wood for a quik pizza and the biggest reason i used it was the smokey taste nowdays i just use smoked cheese on a skillet baked pizza or calzone
The most importent princapel of making skillet pizza is turning the pizza once before you put saus and toppings on there and you need a lid to get it steaming and rising i like making my own saus So here we go !

Tomatos fresh
Garlic
onions
red peppers
mushrooms or kidney beans
paprika powder
pepper
a little suger
salt

For the saus take fresh tomatoes clean cut in 2 or 4 pieces and heat in a pan until the juise comes out this can be done as long as you want for pizza's longer than sauses then get rid of the juise collect for bloody marry or the annimals or just drink it your self when tomatous are almost juisles put in blender or mixer and purate and then heat again to get it thicker in a skillet make your red peppers garlic onions mushrooms or smashed kidney beans then mix with saus heat a little longer with some spices to taste and a little sugar
For the dough :

25 grams fresh yeast

1 kilo flour
oil
smoked cheese
salt
sugar
oregano

First break the yeast in a big glas or bowl with a fork put a teaspoon of suger in there to get the yeast realy going good and 2 table spoons of flour in there mix with fork then ad a little warm water not boiling not cold mix to paste then keep it close to you becouse it wil come out of the glas realy fast a few minutes if your fast enough get a big pan and fill with flour this is realy not so importent you can use half kilo of flour or a kilo i like mixing al types of flour together instead of only white when the yeast has tripled or starts to come out of the pot mix with wooden spoon in the flour ad some warm water to the glas with yeast and keep adding water until it gets stikky ad some oil and salt and mix i like to mix up and down like scraping of little pieces of dow with the wooden spoon like smashing patatoes add flour if needed then continiu with hands until it stops sticking to your hands put it in the same pan you just mixed in and put a wet towel on it keep in a warm place or it wont rise not in front of an open window !!!
Wait minimum 1 hour the more you weight the nicer the dough chop all the toppings and get everything ready
Ok then role the dough not to thin i like using a type of flour for roling that looks a little like cookie flour it wil give a nicer finish
then push with your fingers the crust and poke holes int the middle with a fork then in a warm skillet put the dough with the lid on on medium to high start rolling the next one pay atention 1 minute max turn the pizza when a little golden put on the saus and toppings try some thin onion slices and oregano and close lid 1 more minut and repeat proces

PS if you like wraps just leave away the yeast same princapel
when i make them next time i wil post some pictures

Bon Apatite
 
Bethanny Parker
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OK, I tried Paul's poly dough recipe yesterday. It worked great. It took about 11-12 cups of flour. I used very warm water, not hot. I was afraid of killing the yeast with hot water.

I made one loaf of bread right away. Julia, my picky eater, ate three pieces of buttered bread, and the whole loaf disappeared within about 30 minutes of cutting it, so I guess they liked it.

Then last night, I used some more of the dough to make pizza. No complaints there either. Next time, I will let the dough sit for a few minutes before I start shaping it for the pizza though. I noticed it got easier to work with as it warmed up.

I still have some dough in the fridge.
 
Bill Bradbury
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If you omit the industrialized yeast product and naturally leaven the dough, it will last longer without the gluten breaking down. The pH will also allow it to be more workable. Typically artisan dough has no yeast and long refrigeration times. Also make sure to use a good "artisan bread" flour. This will have a lot less gluten and more fiber in it which will also enhance long term storage and workability as well as digestability. I think a lot of the gluten intolerant people are eating the wrong kinds of bread. The freakishly high gluten levels coupled with a short ferment by non-natural means leaves one with acidic dough and a grumpy belly.
 
After burning through the drip stuff and the french press stuff, Paul has the last, ever, coffee maker. Better living through buying less crap.
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