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Salt brine ferment/pickle something - PEP BB food.sand.salt

BB Food Prep and Preservation - sand badge
 
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Posts: 1114
Location: Soutwest Ohio
410
homeschooling forest garden foraging rabbit tiny house books food preservation cooking writing woodworking homestead
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I decided to turn some carrots from the CSA into ginger pickled carrots. I used all of the following ingredients:

Enough carrots to fill the jar
A knob of ginger
One cinnamon stick (broken into pieces)
4 to 5 cloves
4 to 6 allspice berries
A tablespoon of honey
Water to cover
Pickling salt

Instructions:

1) Tare the scale to not include the jar.
2) Fill the jar with everything but the salt.
3) Weigh the jar to get the combined weight of the solids and liquid.
4) Pour the water into a second jar.
5) Multiply the weight based on the percentage you prefer. 2 to 3% is ideal. I used 2.5% for mine. IE: weight × .025
6) Seal the water and salt jar, shaking until fully dissolved.
7) Pour the brine into the jar of solids and add a weight to prevent floating.
8) Store between 60 and 70 degrees F for a minimum of 4 days, checking regularly. Allow to ferment up to 4 weeks depending on your preference, then transfer to a refrigerator to greatly reduce the fermentation rate. (I'm aiming for 7 to 10 days)

I decided to add the honey last minute for the slight taste benefit. Ignore the plastic wrap. That's just to avoid spilling as I move it to storage.
InitialIngredients.jpg
The initial ingredients
The initial ingredients
Cuttingingredients.jpg
Prepped, but unsliced
Prepped, but unsliced
Jarredcarrots-.jpg
In the jar with the brine
In the jar with the brine
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Opalyn Rose approved this submission.
Note: I hereby certify this badge bit complete.

 
pollinator
Posts: 433
Location: New Jersey, USA
184
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I have a glut of chillies at the moment. Every year brine ferment a large jar or two which then is used as the base of a ‘live’ chilli sauce.

I use a very simple recipe

1) Chop veg to desired size and record the weight
2) Pack into 1 quart jar with a pestle
3) Weigh a beaker of water
4) Pour water into jar full of veg
5) Weigh beaker with remaining water
6) Calculate weight of water in the jar
7) Add the wight of water to veg and multiply by 0.025 to give me the weight of required salt
8) Empty the beaker
9) Pour water from the veg jar into the beaker and add the required weight of salt
10) Stir the water until the salt dissolves and pour back into the veg jar
11) Add a weight to the veg and seal the jar with a breathable lid
12) Write a label and store somewhere cool and dark - my basement

0718E2BE-5BE9-4503-9F5B-33A3FE8F7580.jpeg
Freshly harvested chillies
Freshly harvested chillies
EC54B47C-6A08-4FF1-A87F-A8758B97762E.jpeg
Chopped and weighed
Chopped and weighed
D152BBFF-4431-4310-BFBF-171D970B37F7.jpeg
Added to the jar and pounded down
Added to the jar and pounded down
367B1D59-FC92-4287-99D0-5B66EC4C521A.jpeg
Calculating the weight of water
Calculating the weight of water
19EB5B15-1736-4AF3-AF1E-D5246DEC4EDC.jpeg
[Thumbnail for 19EB5B15-1736-4AF3-AF1E-D5246DEC4EDC.jpeg]
F59F9532-B18A-45C3-BD37-814AB992D425.jpeg
Salt calculation
Salt calculation
6B0F2F8D-9C95-4883-B949-32482E673FC3.jpeg
Weighing the salt
Weighing the salt
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Brine added in and weighted down
Brine added in and weighted down
2A9D5C48-3924-46B8-883C-2313D4F2D1B2.jpeg
Finished jar
Finished jar
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jordan barton approved this submission.

 
Posts: 5
Location: Portland, Oregon
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I made beet kvass! The traditional beverage of my people. :D

Here's the recipe (adapted from https://www.healendo.com/fermentedbeverages):
1. Scrub and chop up some organic beets.
2. Put beets, 1 T. sea salt, and 1 c. whey in a 2-quart glass jar (I actually used a glass milk jug).
3. Fill up the jar the rest of the way with filtered water.
4. Cover the jar with cheesecloth (use a rubber band).
5. Leave it on a shelf in the pantry to ferment.
02_ingredients.jpg
The murder scene
The murder scene
03_making.jpg
The trophy
The trophy
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Opalyn Rose approved this submission.
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Posts: 103
Location: Carlton County, Minnesota, USA: 3b; Dfb; sandy loam; in the woods
31
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I missed harvesting a bunch of broccoli which went on to flower and make seeds. The seed-pods taste good as long as they don’t get too thick, and thus fiberous, so I harvested them. They seem like they’ll make a good veggie/condiment, so I also put them in brine to ferment. They got a handful of cayenne peppers, a cinnamon stick, a bay leaf, and a bulb of garlic for flavor. There is a half-pint jar in the mouth of the half-gallon jar to help raise the brine and lower the produce but it didn’t work perfectly. The lid is just barely on to keep the insert pushed down, allowing limited gas exchange. I’ll taste it in five or twenty weeks.
1900BA4D-F2D2-4A69-A422-10F0D5ACC5AE.jpeg
Growing pods
Growing pods
46427CF5-EE51-4217-B1EE-8E9A7040F57D.jpeg
Two quarts
Two quarts
4EEC20F1-70E1-4CBB-822F-EBD3D577BF09.jpeg
Some dried cayenne from last year
Some dried cayenne from last year
F12C92AD-0794-403E-B0FA-11F9C838B0B0.jpeg
2 tbs salt per quart of water
2 tbs salt per quart of water
7A8EC84F-0CF7-48E7-A853-3CBD0E0642A4.jpeg
Packed up and ready to age
Packed up and ready to age
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Nicole Alderman approved this submission.
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