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Advice planning our homestead

 
Posts: 21
Location: Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee
5
cattle kids homestead
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I have been doing a self study on Permaculture but I haven’t been through a PDC, yet. Our goal is to do some gardening (perennials and annuals) raise chickens, goats, dairy cow/beef calves for the freezer, beekeeping , and maybe pigs. I have done a base map, zone map, and sector analysis map. We are growing zone 6 and at 2000 feet above sea level. Any advice or input will be appreciated.
6A4502B6-26D7-4416-B879-B22DB07EF7E9.jpeg
Base map
Base map
FD4708ED-F354-449C-A4FE-4CA66EFE466A.jpeg
Sector analysis
Sector analysis
AB6DC036-70E1-471B-877C-79C70940E7AC.jpeg
Zone map
Zone map
 
Posts: 112
Location: Southern Manitoba, Canada, Zone 3B
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How much land is this? How many acres of each zone are you working with?

How many animals are you planning for? Are you bringing feed in or producing it yourself?

Are there any fences in place or will you be building them?

I assume no barns, coops, or weather shelters are already existing so you will be building them.

I’m no authority on permaculture. My experience is with grazing sheep, pigs, and poultry. Planting and maintaining pasture is a major part of that and it takes more effort than most people think.

Get fences, buildings, and pasture in place and ready before adding the animals. I have made the mistake of getting stock too soon and it takes years of hard work to recover from that. Don’t do it.

Access to water is also very important for your stock. You need a good plan and system in place. Running water and/or the ability to move it to the animals. I used 1000 litre totes to move water to my stock. They worked well until my flock was up to 80+ head. At that point the hot days of summer meant refilling a couple times a week to ensure fresh clean water.

Rotational use of the land is also important. Don’t keep animals on the same ground for too long. Ideally move them as the forage is eaten down. Cows graze high grasses, Goats a little lower. Pigs and chickens then clean behind. That will give maximum use of the forage and then dispersal of the manure. The pigs and chickens help reduce the flies attracted by the cow patties when they spread them all over.

If you want to colllect manure use a central pen or coral where the larger animals can be fed and watered each day after coming in from grazing.

There is sooooo much that could be written
 
pollinator
Posts: 2272
Location: Bendigo , Australia
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dog gear plumbing earthworks bee building homestead
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Pretty open ended question!
My advice is to research, buy books attend open days and seminars.

Its not a subject one can learn on a forum alone.
 
Jim Aldridge
Posts: 21
Location: Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee
5
cattle kids homestead
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We have 12 acres. We aren't sure how many animals we want. We know we want at least one dairy cow and the ability to raise enough beef for my wife, my son, and I for the year, if possible. Along with that, we want poultry, pigs, and goats, but we aren't sure about the numbers. It isn't fenced yet, and we don't have barns, coops, or shelters up yet. There is a sense in which it is still somewhat of a "blank slate," but that's why I really want to do the planning process right.
 
John C Daley
pollinator
Posts: 2272
Location: Bendigo , Australia
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dog gear plumbing earthworks bee building homestead
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Somewhere on this whole site, I created a check list for exactly what you are doing.
Maybe search for it, good luck.
 
master steward
Posts: 5843
Location: USDA Zone 8a
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Similar to what has been said there are just too many variables.

I would start my planning with the gardens and chickens.

After those are drawn in maybe it will be easier to add other buildings or for others to offer some suggestions.

Have you put any thought into what size garden you will want?  Are you planning a kitchen garden? If so it would be placed near the door that has access to the kitchen.

Are you planning a stationary chicken house? That would also be good to have access to the kitchen.

On our homestead, we had a big garden outside the back door and then the chicken house was on the other side of the garden.

We were in a mild climate so we did not plan any other housing for animals. we had a beef cow or two.

Later on, our daughter wanted a pony so that is when we built a loafing shed.  After the pony left, we had no need for it so the cows used it for shade.

When our daughter did a pig for 4-H we built a pen and a small shelter for the pig.  It all went away after the pig went away.

This thread from similar threads might offer some helpful information:

https://permies.com/t/5192/permaculture-designing-tools
 
klorinth McCoy
Posts: 112
Location: Southern Manitoba, Canada, Zone 3B
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One other suggestion I have from personal experience is to not skimp on the quality of your building. Do it right the first time.

It's not about the amount of money you put into what you build. It's the quality of the building. If you build it right it will last for longer and you won't be replacing it in just a couple years.

This is especially true with animals shelters and buildings. Cows, goats, and pigs are hard on them.
 
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Ernie and Erica Wisner's Rocket Mass Heater Everything Combo
https://permies.com/t/40993/Ernie-Erica-Wisner-Rocket-Mass
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