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Quick Question - Transplanting from one climate region to another

 
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I was wondering how plants that exist throughout various climate regions- like, a plant that is native to both tropics & temperate areas-- will do when transplanted from one region to the other?

I know some plants have different subspecies & one might do better in one area, whereas another works somewhere else, but what about plants which have no subspecies? If a plant sprouted in tropics & was moved to a place that experiences winter, despite the same plant being native to both places, will it survive? Would the transplant activate different genes to behave differently in the new environment, or would the plant die of shock when winter came? Can the way this works differ by species? I can't find anything on the specific answers I want through Googling. There was a plant I was thinking of acquiring next year, but I can only find one seller who ships love plants & they are in Florida. I live in northern Ohio.
 
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7 AHS:4 GDD:3000 Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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Harden Off
If you take a plant from 80F tropic and fly to say 30F in 24hrs in November it will die, because it didn't get time to acclimate. But if you move it in the summer, the tree will harden off. Then it will be more likely to survive.
Landrace/Cultivars
If its a name cultivar that is know to survives in say both zone 10 and zone 6, it will be fine. But if it is a seedling (aka a landrace) then it might not survive.
Early Blooming/Late Frost
You might have noticed that some even temperate plant, have cultivars, that flower too early so while the tree is fine the flowers are killed by frost and there is no fruits.
Late Ripening
We have some cultivars that ripen too late in the season for us to pick ripe fruits, even thought the tree itself is hardy.
GDD/Enough Heat
Other times a specific cultivar might need more growing degree days (aka zone 9 florida vs zone 9 Pacific Northwest).
Self-Fertile
It might also be that it needs a pollinator and it flowers out of sync when compared to the local ones, so even though the tree and flowers is fine it might not set fruit.
Soil Type
It could also be that you are moving landrace that is adopted to low ph, swampy soil to an area that has little rain, high pH, with a bit of salt.

Recommendation
It would probably be best to get quite a few seeds and then plant those and out of 10seeds select the best one.

But overall I would say give it a try
 
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This thread: https://permies.com/t/164098/Russian-Fruit-Trenches featured an article that mentioned a Russian project to increase fruit tree hardiness. Their method was to take seeds from trees and plant them further north, then collect seeds from the fruit generated there and plant them further north again. The project was based on the idea that trees pass on hardiness traits in their seed DNA and that gradual changes in environment can be adapted to genetically. This logic suggests that the hardiness of seeds for a particular cultivar can vary greatly based on the location of the parent tree.
 
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The age of the plant is also known to affect its ability to adapt to colder climates. Younger olive trees are more likely to survive being moved to a colder region than older specimens, so you might want to preferentially search out a younger plant. Older trees tend to succumb to frost damage and/or be completely killed by frost whereas younger trees bounce back much quicker.
 
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