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Inoculating Eucalyptus with fungi

 
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Hi all

Im in south Portugal around 6oo meters up on a mountain and have tone of Eucalyptus growing very close together.
Anyone know which mushroom I can grow on the eucalyptus?

Cheers
Sebastian
 
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Field & Forest says that Eucalyptus is "satisfactory" for growing Shiitake, although I have no experience with that wood. Here's their chart:

https://www.fieldforest.net/category/growing-outdoors

There is another thread on here somewhere about this very topic. It seems that growing Chicken-of-Woods on Eucalyptus is a bit controversial. I'd probably stick with Shiitake, just to be safe.

I did a little bit of research and apparently Eucalyptus is commonly used for Shiitake production in Brazil. Different species of Eucalyptus have different success rates with different strains of Shiitake. Consult your local mushroom spawn company for more specific strain info. Good luck!
 
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In my experience shiitakes perform best on Eucalyptus.

And... on the other subject that will inevitably be brought up...

I grow culinary mushrooms on Eucalyptus spp and eat 'em. Before I did though, I did some due diligence deep research and this is what I came up with:

The great majority of people who eat properly cooked Chicken-of-the-Woods enjoy the culinary experience. A small minority of people can get an upset stomach from Chicken-of-the-Woods due to the mushroom’s phenylethylamine alkaloids and / or due to undercooking their mushrooms.

Chicken-of-the-Woods is a wood-loving parasite and saprophyte. As it kills a tree and then consumes its decaying remains, it molecularly disassembles the compounds in the tree in an enzymatic process known as lysis.

Chicken-of-the-Woods is often found growing on trees in the genus Eucalyptus.

Living Eucalyptus trees exhibit allelopathic effects which inhibit the growth of nearby plant species. Eucalyptus trees are often a targeted by native plant enthusiasts (outside Australia) due to this tendency.

Eucalyptol (the major portion of eucalyptus oil) is used in cuisine for its pleasant fragrance and taste. Eucalyptus oil is also used as an herbal medicine (including by traditional Aboriginal people). It is enjoyed in food in small doses. In higher doses, eucalyptus additive oil flavorings can sometimes cause gastric upset in some people.

There is no current scientific evidence of Eucalyptus oils making their way into mushroom fruit bodies in quantities large enough to cause gastric upset. In fact, saprophytic fungi (like Chicken-of-the-Woods and shiitake) are known to denature aromatics in their substrates.

There appears to be an inference that exists that claims the allelopathic compounds or oils in Eucalyptus trees may be to blame for for people’s upset stomachs after eating Chicken-of-the-Woods that had been growing on trees in this genus. There is no study yet proving or disproving the inference that either the oils or allelopathic compounds that are inhibiting surrounding plant growth are A. being uptaken by the mushrooms nor B. the cause of the tummy aches in the folks consuming them.

In Australia, native home of the genus Eucalyptus, shiitake mushrooms are grown commercially in large quantities on tree species in this genus. In fact, Field and Forest (a major mushroom spawn supplier in North America) lists that shiitake can be grown on Eucalyptus logs (https://www.fieldforest.net/category/growing-outdoors#logs).

Under-cooked shiitake mushrooms can cause a rash (shiitake flagellate dermatitis) in a minority of people.

In blind taste tests, Australian chefs prefer the flavor and aroma of shiitake mushrooms grown on Eucalyptus wood and offer them to the public all the time. The implication here being that culinary mushrooms are in fact uptaking some of the micronutrients from certain respective wood species. However, Australian chefs - being adept at thoroughly and properly cooking mushrooms - do not complain about upset tummies from eating shiitake mushrooms grown on their preferred wood species: Eucalyptus.

I have personally spoken with many people who have enjoyed their experience eating culinary mushrooms grown on Eucalyptus wood and I have (anecdotally) never met a person who has claimed to have gotten an upset tummy from eating any Chicken-of-the-Woods or shiitake mushroom or any other culinary mushroom (eg. oysters) growing on Eucalyptus. Not that these upset tummies aren’t out there, they just appear to be in a small minority and the exact cause of the upset has yet to be pinpointed (Undercooking? Personal allergy to a particular mushroom species? Eucalyptus oil or compound?). One local mushroom forager and cultivator I spoke with who eats lots of culinary mushrooms, including plenty from Eucalyptus, reports no ill effects from eating Chicken-of-the-Woods or shiitake mushrooms growing from these trees and recommends to those concerned that this might be the cause of their upset tummies to “throw the first flush of the mushrooms on the inoculated Eucalyptus out as the first flush often contains the highest concentration of the wood’s compounds. Then test out the second flush – with a well-cooked, small quantity – and see how your body handles it.”

After all this deep research and numerous personal very tasty, happy tummy meals from culinary mushrooms grown on Eucalyptus I therefore concluded that:

Most people who eat properly cooked Chicken-of-the-Woods, shiitakes, and other culinary mushrooms grown on Eucalyptus wood have a delectably positive experience and Australian chefs seek these Eucalyptus-grown culinary mushrooms out for their superior flavors and aromas.

Some people get upset tummies or rashes eating certain culinary mushrooms that a majority of people do not have issues metabolizing, likely because the offending mushrooms were undercooked. Best practice: if it’s your first time eating a new-to-you culinary mushroom species, be sure to thoroughly cook it and just eat a small quantity first and see how your body reacts before eating more.

Not only is there no scientific evidence that the oils or alellopathic compounds of Eucalyptus trees are the cause of people’s upset tummies after having eaten a culinary mushroom growing from one these woods, it’s more likely that these saprophytic mushroom’s enzymatic process of lysis is actually converting these compounds into scrumptious flavors and aromas and that some folks are either not thoroughly cooking their mushrooms or are possibly allergic to a certain mushroom species.

Below is a photo of shiitakes fruiting on a Eucalyptus totem from a log inoculation workshop I held last February. A participant took this inoculated bolt home and just sent me this photo a couple of weeks ago. He and his whole family harvested, properly cooked and ate the shiitakes from the growing from the Eucalyptus we inoculated. They enjoyed the flavor of the Eucalyptus-grown shiitake mushrooms and did not report any tummy aches.
FRUITING-shiitake_on_Eucalyptus_2021.10.06-CROP.jpg
shiitake mushrooms on Eucalyptus log
shiitake mushrooms on Eucalyptus log
 
Sebastian Wolff
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Thanks Mike for such an in-depth response.
Thats great news and confirmed by Paul Stamets book that few did get some negative effects.
Have you had any experience on growing on the stumps?
Im quite familiar with Eucalyptuses rapid regrowth from stumps.
Could or does it work?

cheers
SW
 
Mike Kenzie
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Sebastian Wolff wrote:Thanks Mike for such an in-depth response.
Thats great news and confirmed by Paul Stamets book that few did get some negative effects.
Have you had any experience on growing on the stumps?
Im quite familiar with Eucalyptuses rapid regrowth from stumps.
Could or does it work?

cheers
SW


You're welcome Sebastian.
Yes, growing culinary mushrooms on stumps does work.
As far as the re-growth is concerned, I recommend lopping off the shoots with pruners until the tree gives up and dies. As Chicken-of-the-Woods is a parasite-saprophyte, one strategy might be to inoculate the stump with your local Iberian Laetiporus and having its mycelium aid in your battle against the tree's death throes.
It works, the thing to remember though is that there is still a lot of food (woody root mass) underneath the stump that needs to be consumed by the mycelium before it will fruit mushrooms. Depending on the size of the stump and its root mass it may be several years before you see mushrooms fruiting from the inoculated stump. The reward for your patience may be many years - possibly even decades - of mushrooms... :-)
EDIBLE-Laetiporus_sulphureus-chicken_of_the_woods_by_voir_ci-dessous_CC_BY-SA_3.0_WikiMedia.jpg
Laetiporus sulphureus chicken of the woods by voir ci-dessous CC BY-SA 3.0 WikiMedia.ORG
Laetiporus sulphureus chicken of the woods by voir ci-dessous CC BY-SA 3.0 WikiMedia.ORG
 
I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/cards
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