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Backyard pond for trout?

 
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Hey everybody, I have a question. I am thinking of building a pond in my backyard, a small one about 15-20 feet diameter, with aeration, natural rocks and all that stuff. The question, can wild river trout thrive in a pond? By thrive I mean live and reproduce.
Thanks to everyone.
Cheers, Vase
 
pollinator
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From; -5-reasons-to-stock-rainbow-trout/
Can you put trout in a pond?
The most popular reasons trout are added to ponds are: ... Small trout can be added to bass ponds in fall while the water is still warm enough for the bass to be active and cold enough for the trout to live.
They then serve as an outstanding food source for pond owners looking to grow big bass.
From; trout_pond_management.pdf
Trout live in water temperatures between 33° - 75°F, but grow most rapidly in water 50° - 65°F and are less susceptible to parasites and diseases.
Ponds are unlikely to be this cool unless fed by springs or deep groundwater.
 
pollinator
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Definitely possible but they are more needy than other fish. Also more delicious! They need cold water but a brown trout can survive in much warmer water than a rainbow or brook trout. I wanna say 58F is prime trout temperature but I am not sure I am remembering that correctly. They also need lots of oxygen, so go big on aeration. Like John said, this whole thing will be hard to do without a cold stream fed pond.

My neighbor had a trout pond for about 10 years but ended up switching to bass as the pond silted up and got warmer. There are tons of ponds with massive trout around my area but a little higher up in elevation,probably around 4000ft. They are all stream fed.
 
Vase Angjeleski
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How about carp, like prussian silver carp? I hear they are very sturdy and tolerate hot and cold waters.
 
Dan Fish
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Not a clue there. I'd probably go with tilapia if I had a purpose built fish pond. Just because everyone does it so there must be something to that.
 
John C Daley
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From; /pests/invasive-animals
Tilapia were introduced into Australia in the 1970s as ornamental fish and are now a major threat to Australia's native biodiversity.
Females carry their eggs and small fry in their mouths, and these can survive for a long time after the adult dies.
Therefore, releasing living or dead fish into waterways can cause new infestations.
Tilapia is a restricted noxious fish under the Biosecurity Act 2014.
From; Wikipedia
Tilapia  become a problematic invasive species because of the  new warm-water habitats such as Australia.
But in North America it is the fourth-most consumed fish in the United States dating back to 2002.
The popularity of tilapia came about due to its low price, easy preparation, and mild taste.

'In the United States, tilapia are found in much of the south, especially Florida and Texas, and as far north as Idaho, where they survive in power-plant discharge zones.
Tilapia are also currently stocked in the Phoenix, Arizona, canal system as an algal growth-control measure.'

 
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