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Blackboy peach seeds

 
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Hi!

Concrete question here: does anyone have heirloom, untreated blackboy peach seeds they could sell me? I would REALLY appreciate this. They aren't so easy to attain.

Thank you!
 
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I'm also looking. Hopefully, someone will have some! 🙂
 
gardener
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Location: Zone 9A, 45S 168E, 329m Queenstown, NZ
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I have a blackboy peach grown from a stone, cannot claim that it's a heirloom although I know that the original tree that the fruit came from was planted in the sixties.

The tree is on the grounds of a stone cottage in Gibbston dating back to 1913. The first commercial vineyards in Gibbston Valley were established in the 1980's but grapes were first planted by French settlers in the 1860's.

It is believed that the blackboy peaches in NZ came with early settlers from France and are most closely related to the peches de vigne.

If you want me to post you some stones, the fruit ripen in March.

Just send me a purple moosage and we can sort out postage costs.

20180324_105336.jpg
Black boy peaches
Black boy peaches
20230310_145716.jpg
Blackboy peach
Blackboy peach
20230325_170447.jpg
Blackboy peach tree in fruit at 11 years
Blackboy peach tree in fruit at 11 years
20170923_140528.jpg
Blackboy peach tree in blossom at 5 yrs
Blackboy peach tree in blossom at 5 yrs
 
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Location: Lebanon
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Bojana Vojvodic wrote:Hi!

Concrete question here: does anyone have heirloom, untreated blackboy peach seeds they could sell me? I would REALLY appreciate this. They aren't so easy to attain.

Thank you!




just a friendly tip, I would recommend getting a scion rather than a seed if you're looking for a genuine fruiting tree because there's a high chance you'd just get a wild variety if you're looking to grow it from a seed
 
Farid Chbeir
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Location: Lebanon
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Bojana Vojvodic wrote:Hi!

Concrete question here: does anyone have heirloom, untreated blackboy peach seeds they could sell me? I would REALLY appreciate this. They aren't so easy to attain.

Thank you!



I would recommend looking in countries which were french colonies like my country Lebanon where we have alot
 
Megan Palmer
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Farid Chbeir wrote:

Bojana Vojvodic wrote:Hi!
just a friendly tip, I would recommend getting a scion rather than a seed if you're looking for a genuine fruiting tree because there's a high chance you'd just get a wild variety if you're looking to grow it from a seed




From practical experience of having grown dozens of blackboy peach trees from the stones of the tree in my garden, there has been very little variation in the quality of the  flavour, size and fruiting ability of the stone grown trees.

It may be because there are very few (if any) other peach trees in the nearby gardens and in any event, this variety of peach is self fertile.

I have found that the older varieties of peaches tend to grow true to type.

I have an 8 year old stone grown white fleshed peach that was collected from a roadside in our region that produces delicious peaches that taste just as good as its parent tree; a clingstone firm fleshed peach popular for fresh eating and preserving known as Golden Queen here in NZ that also grows true to type and numerous others that are un named.

Have you you ever attempted to grow a peach from a stone?

I can highly recommend that you do - they often fruit within 3 years.
 
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I've had similar experience to Megan and plant lots of heritage peach stones. We're in a much more humid part of the country here and peaches tend to succumb to fungal ailments and blights, so a lot of the nursery stock varieties just don't last in this location. I seek out seed from old trees, abandoned farmsteads, and pā sites. They grow fast and often have fruit by the third year. If they don't make it, I've got a dozen more waiting to fill the spot.

The consensus from heritage tree experts that I've talked to is that the old varieties stay true to type when planted as seeds.
 
Bojana Vojvodic
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Hi Megan (and all who are commenting on this post)!

Sure, I'd be interested in buying blackboy peach seeds. What's your price per seed?

Regards,
BV

 
Megan Palmer
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Location: Zone 9A, 45S 168E, 329m Queenstown, NZ
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Bojana Vojvodic wrote:Hi Megan (and all who are commenting on this post)!

Sure, I'd be interested in buying blackboy peach seeds. What's your price per seed?

Regards,
BV



The stones are free, you just need to reimburse me for the postage.

Tap on the envelope on the top right of this page to send me a purple moosage with your address and I will let you know how much the postage will be.

The fruit won't ripen until the end of March, early April.
 
gardener
Posts: 504
Location: Wabash, Indiana, Zone 6a
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Oh, my!

j

Megan Palmer wrote:I have a blackboy peach grown from a stone, cannot claim that it's a heirloom although I know that the original tree that the fruit came from was planted in the sixties.

The tree is on the grounds of a stone cottage in Gibbston dating back to 1913. The first commercial vineyards in Gibbston Valley were established in the 1980's but grapes were first planted by French settlers in the 1860's.

It is believed that the blackboy peaches in NZ came with early settlers from France and are most closely related to the peches de vigne.

If you want me to post you some stones, the fruit ripen in March.

Just send me a purple moosage and we can sort out postage costs.

 
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