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Will pit fruits grown from seed breed true  RSS feed

 
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Hi Toby, I've asked this before but I'd like to get your take on it. Will pit fruits grown from seed breed true, and if so, can they be left unpruned without growing so tall they fruit is out of reach. Also, if one grafts a tree grown from seed, isn't that a form of pruning that will require the tree to be forever pruned? Thanks.
 
pollinator
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which pit fruits are you talking about in particular?
 
eric firpo
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Mainly peaches, nectarines, plums, apricots, cherries.
 
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Those fruit trees grown from seed will tend to grow from 15 - 30 feet tall, depending on the variety and conditions.
 
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Most stone fruits grow more or less true from seed, unlike apples and pears. They may reach a different height than the parent tree, since they aren't grafted to a controlled rootstock. Seedling plums tend to be thorny and tall, so grafting them gets you a more useful tree, but seedlings can grow very vigorously and self-select for your local conditions, so they have their advantages too.
 
eric firpo
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Thanks for clearing that up.
 
pollinator
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An inexpensive means of getting a good orchard would be to plant the stones and later graft known cultivars to the young tree. These will produce true to variety.
 
eric firpo
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I'm sure I'll do some grafting on trees grown from seed, but others I'll just let 'em grow and see what happens. Thanks for the responses.
 
pollinator
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here where we have acerage to play with so it doesn't really matter if you get a dud, I've planted several trees from seed/pit/nut. I've so far been fairly happy with the results, although probably not a known fruit, in most cases, still very edible. My self seeded apple that is the largest and closest to my house has really good eating apples and it bears very very heavily each year (unless it freezes late)..the one that is beyond my pond, has the wierdest dry apples, but if they are picked as soon as they ripen, they are still quite juicy and very tasty..totally different than I've ever seen.

I tend to grab seeds, fruit and nuts off of whatever trees, shrubs, etc that I'm around as we have a 10 acre oldfield that I throw them out into, this year I have thrown out berries for the birds as well as plums, oaks, mtn ash, apples, pears and others..hopefully some of those will grow. Sister in law last year gave me two peaches she grew from seeds from the trees in her yard near Toledo..always a surprise what you get..but that is half the fun.
 
eric firpo
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Sounds really cool Brenda!
 
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Toby,

When you say will grow true to seed, what does that mean?
If the stone fruit, say apricot was grafted, is the now grafted fruit true?

Also I have hear if one grafts to a tree, if the graft is essentially the same size as the branch grafting to then it will be just as strong a tree, any thought here?

I also find in many areas, like N California, that strong root stock wouldn't seem that critical because the weather is relatively mild.

Thanks if you answer.

Sammy
 
Toby Hemenway
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My firsthand experience with this is limited to plums. The grafted variety grows from a seed, or at least it looks and tasted the same to me. I have been told this is the case for alls tone fruits. I assume it is true for apricots, but don't know for sure. I think someone ought to find a more certain source of info on this; mine was from a very experienced Colorado orchardist, but ya never know.
 
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