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My bee house seems to working!
20230927_130505.jpg
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master pollinator
Posts: 492
Location: Wabash, Indiana, Zone 6a
225
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Here's a unique take on a carpenter bee house. I was going to build a mason bee house, but I have a carpenter bee problem (they're burrowing into the structural 4x4s on my back porch. And I want the bees! They pollinate my fruit trees. I found the "frame" at a local thrift shop, and my brain went to work. It's all natural softwood construction with metal hinges. I filled the shelves with kiln-dried untreated pine 2x4, and wedged them into place with untreated bottom trim from a previous house project. The holes are 1/2 inch "starter holes" because carpenter bees like to burrow out the cavities themselves. I just gave them 32 starting points. We'll see how well it is inhabited when the warm weather returns, but after the larvae hatch and I cover the holes in my structural 4x4's they'll be forced to inhabit this lovely home or go somewhere else (hopefully not too far away).

Hope you don't mind I did it as a video, it's easier to show what I did than if I used a bunch of pictures.



j
Staff note (gir bot) :

Paul Fookes approved this submission.
Note: I certify this BB complete.  Well done

Staff note (Paul Fookes) :

Jim,
Videos usually need to be under two (2) minutes.  Overall great use of materials and explanation.
The information below is really creative.  Thinking outside the square.

 
Jim Garlits
master pollinator
Posts: 492
Location: Wabash, Indiana, Zone 6a
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hugelkultur monies forest garden foraging trees books food preservation bike bee writing rocket stoves
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Something I just thought of, with the doors open and the pegs exposed, I could rig something up like little bee watering containers there and knock out another BB! I gotta give this some more thought...

j

Jim Garlits wrote:Here's a unique take on a carpenter bee house. I was going to build a mason bee house, but I have a carpenter bee problem (they're burrowing into the structural 4x4s on my back porch. And I want the bees! They pollinate my fruit trees. I found the "frame" at a local thrift shop, and my brain went to work. It's all natural softwood construction with metal hinges. I filled the shelves with kiln-dried untreated pine 2x4, and wedged them into place with untreated bottom trim from a previous house project. The holes are 1/2 inch "starter holes" because carpenter bees like to burrow out the cavities themselves. I just gave them 32 starting points. We'll see how well it is inhabited when the warm weather returns, but after the larvae hatch and I cover the holes in my structural 4x4's they'll be forced to inhabit this lovely home or go somewhere else (hopefully not too far away).

Hope you don't mind I did it as a video, it's easier to show what I did than if I used a bunch of pictures.



j

 
Posts: 38
Location: Boise, ID
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hugelkultur chicken homestead
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While I was moving and putting siding on my chicken coop, I was gently buzzed many times.
One ambitious bee even tried to nest in the screw hole I had predrilled, an unsafe adventure for everyone.
I needed a quick solution.

I looked up local bee info through our extension office and found in early spring mason bees like roughly 8mm holes.
I went with 3/8", though I'm considering making more with 5/16" or 1/4", along with a less uniform design next time.

I drilled ~4" deep holes into the side of an untreated cedar fence board using the drill press, cut it to a reasonable length, then mounted it on my chicken coop (away from chicken access). I saw a resident the very first day

I present for your consideration, The Bee-Line:
UnderConstruction.jpg
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DrilledOut.jpg
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CutToLength.jpg
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MountingDetail.jpg
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Protected.jpg
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Staff note (gir bot) :

Someone approved this submission.

 
If you try to please everybody, your progress is limited by the noisiest fool. And this tiny ad:
full time farm crew job w/ housing
https://permies.com/t/178213/jobs-offered/experiences/full-time-farm-crew-member
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