• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Leigh Tate
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Jay Angler
  • Nancy Reading
gardeners:
  • Beau Davidson
  • thomas rubino
  • L. Johnson

Help with ID - Kentucky Coffee Tree seeds

 
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I need help identifying this. It is hard to break but they are everywhere around my campus. A hammer won't crack it and a knife won't cut it. We taped it to the doorframe and slammed it shut. This seed(?) shattered everywhere. PLEASE HELP
unnamed-(1).jpg
[Thumbnail for unnamed-(1).jpg]
Inkedunnamed-(2)_LI.jpg
[Thumbnail for Inkedunnamed-(2)_LI.jpg]
unnamed.jpg
[Thumbnail for unnamed.jpg]
 
master steward
Posts: 10444
Location: USDA Zone 8a
3130
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Have you identified what plant, bush or tree these are growing on?

Having a picture of what those seeds came of of would really help.

Also seeing what a leaf looks like up close.
 
Posts: 18
Location: Upstate NY zone 5b
4
2
trees chicken homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Looks like Kentucky Coffee Tree seed. They grow in large pods.
 
gardener
Posts: 1283
Location: the mountains of western nc
329
forest garden trees foraging chicken food preservation wood heat
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
yep, kentucky coffee tree, Gymnocladus.
 
Anne Miller
master steward
Posts: 10444
Location: USDA Zone 8a
3130
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I merged your stuff with the following thread. I hope that is okay by you.
 
gardener
Posts: 2905
Location: South of Capricorn
1364
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

j te wrote:I really need help identifying this seed. They're all over my campus and idk what it is. They are VERY hard to break. A hammer won't crack it and a knife won't cut it. My roommate and I could only get it open after taping it to the doorframe and slamming the door on it.


what does that white bit on the side look like? if it's more of a line than a spot it could be a lablab bean; if it didn't have the white spot it could be kentucky coffee tree seed.
 
jay hopkin
Posts: 7
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Tereza Okava wrote:

j te wrote:I really need help identifying this seed. They're all over my campus and idk what it is. They are VERY hard to break. A hammer won't crack it and a knife won't cut it. My roommate and I could only get it open after taping it to the doorframe and slamming the door on it.


what does that white bit on the side look like? if it's more of a line than a spot it could be a lablab bean; if it didn't have the white spot it could be kentucky coffee tree seed.



I googled a Kentucky coffee tree seed and that’s very much what it looks like. thank you so much!!!
 
jay hopkin
Posts: 7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The seed was found in Nebraska. I’m not sure which tree it specifically came from. Do Kentucky coffee tree seeds grow there??
 
Anne Miller
master steward
Posts: 10444
Location: USDA Zone 8a
3130
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


Kentucky coffeetree is one I enjoy in the winter because of the interesting bark and the seedpods that are present through the winter months.

Kentucky Coffeetree, Gymnocladus dioicus, is a large, native tree that grows up to 75 feet tall and 40-50 feet wide.



Kentucky coffeetree is a great choice for Nebraska because it tolerates drought conditions,



https://acreagenebraska.org/2020/01/23/kentucky-coffeetree/
 
Permaculture isn't that hard to understand. Sometimes a little bump helps: richsoil.com/cards
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic