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What to do with a big plastic garbage container

 
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Hi,
I just got a big garbage container that is used in Spain.

I know it's a valuable thing to upcycle but I'm not sure what to do with it.

First thing I thought was a big vermicompost but it's probably too tall for that.

Can you give me any suggestions?
Image attached

Thanks!!
IMG-20220708-WA0004.jpg
upcycle wheelie bin
 
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Bury and fill with water for pond.
Bury and use as root cellar.
Store already dry, fiddly little bits of firewood. I'm thinking smaller branches, scraps of lumber, or even pinecones. Whatever you burn that doesn't stack well.
 
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If it's watertight, use it for any kind of dry storage. I always have things that I don't want inside the house but that need to stay dry.
 
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A composting worm farm
 
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Pearl Sutton wrote:If it's watertight, use it for any kind of dry storage. I always have things that I don't want inside the house but that need to stay dry.



Right - dry and away from critters!
 
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Joshua LeDuc wrote:

Pearl Sutton wrote:If it's watertight, use it for any kind of dry storage. I always have things that I don't want inside the house but that need to stay dry.



Right - dry and away from critters!



Please be aware that rats can chew through plastic and depending on the geometry even through metal.

Maybe use it for what it was inteded: to collect residual waste.

I like the pond idea, have done similar things, but the issue is that you generally to not want to bury plastic(who will unbury it after you pass away or leve the place?).

Maybe use it as rainwater storage for later irrigation?

But then again it is a container that has been used for waste, so maybe you don't want to irrigate from it, because who knows what has been disposed in it before.
 
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I have wormfarms that size. They work just great. Wheels are handy, you can roll it to whatever tree needs a bit of extra feeding at the time.  
 
Diego de Sousa
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Natasha Abrahams wrote:I have wormfarms that size. They work just great. Wheels are handy, you can roll it to whatever tree needs a bit of extra feeding at the time.  



I was thinking that maybe is not the best approach. I have a vertical system with floors so I'm used to worms. I would bury the bin like 3/4 so the temperature is stable inside. Seems harder to harvest but it probably would work. Maybe red wigglers stay on the most surface part and regular earth worms stay deeper?
 
Diego de Sousa
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Jan White wrote:Bury and fill with water for pond.
Bury and use as root cellar.
Store already dry, fiddly little bits of firewood. I'm thinking smaller branches, scraps of lumber, or even pinecones. Whatever you burn that doesn't stack well.



I like the root cellar idea.

About the pond... I think it's too deep and the lid would be useless.
 
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