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I want to get land and like minded people to permaculture  RSS feed

 
Susan Private
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Hello! I wish to buy some land somewhere but not sure where in the USA is the smartest place to do it. So advise PLEASE!!
I wish to get with other people to live together and permaculture.
I desire to have a large garden, all types of fruit trees and some farm animals.
Where is the weather not too hot in summer and not too cold in winter to grow crops well? I am know California is nice but the property taxes alone are far too expensive.
 
lyla moore
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Hello susan, it appears we are looking for the same thing. Have you considered southern Colorado? I visited there several years ago and loved it. Land is available for not to much and varied - mountains, foothills and high plains. Climate is moderate. Check out my post. Or email me with more details of your plans lylamoore56@yahoo.com
 
Norman Fichter
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Hello. I think this is a great idea and am very interested in the details.
 
Jason Lindsay
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I'm in. Personally I love the ozarks. Always wanted to live there. Visited many times. Planning my exit strategy from kc now.
 
Norman Fichter
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Hey Jason, I agree...Ozarks. Heading that way exploring. Got my RV loaded and motorcycle in tow. Property sitting east of Dallas for a month. I'm originally from SW Iowa so, maybe biased, but rich land and beautiful! I have searched many listings throughout the grain belt. Still looking.... small rural organic farm
 
D.A. Hanks
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Hi Susan-

There are several things to keep in mind when looking for land. First, it needs water. This is the most important aspect of getting a homestead or community going. You also need to look at the lay of the land and the fertility/pH of the soil. Your land needs to be able to produce.

Now, does your land have simple groundwater or does it have flowing water? If the answer to that question is "yes," then it puts you in a position to add micro hydro to your compound.

Finding land for a reasonable price is the hardest part, but there are still deals to be made out there. You just need to be willing to dig for them.
 
Jay Vinekeeper
Posts: 78
Location: Northwest Lower MI
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Hello Ms Susan

Grow where you are planted?

We live and work in northern lower Michigan. Upland forests, lots of lakes and steams. We call it "Fruitland" because of the density of wild, food giving plants as well as the sheer volume of mixed fruit production on these hills overlooking the big lakes.

We have found this unique microclimate and local culture to be very conducive to research and development in permaculture applications. We currently shepard an 80 acre spread surrounded by forested lands where "tree crops", forest gardens, and perennial polycultures have been started and tested.

We also have improved plantations of sheet composting evergreen systems providing not only an endless supply of mulch/compost, but also vast amounts of building materials.

We are looking for the next generation of stewards to look over this work and neighborhood (we are 64 and have been at this more or less for most of our lives since or mid-30's).

Can we help you? We have many ideas for how healthy and enlightened humans could live gracefully with the products of their own earthcare. Permaculture ethic number one: EARTH CARE

If interested, please introduce your ideas to ... vinekeeper@forestfarm.org

All best wishes for your greatest success.

be well
vinekeeper
 
Evan Nilla
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Susan, always be conscious of water, always be wary of water. If you get enough rain and use the right crops and plant family you don't have to irrigate. Consider this over everything else, its not worth buying cheap land in a place that gets 18" of water, that will only be enough water long into the future for a very small space. Look at precipitation maps and rain levels in specific areas, how much rain and when it falls. Go where the water is.
 
Susan Private
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Thank you everyone for your responses.
I've been pretty busy so have not had time to respond.
It would be a dream come true to make this happen.
 
Elisabeth Tea
Posts: 53
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I agree you should go where the water is.

In addition, look to where zoning laws will allow you to raise plants and animals without spending your entire life fighting the system. My sister and I live only 5 miles apart, but there is a lot I can do that she cannot because she lives within the city limits and I live in an unincorporated area.
 
Florida Barker
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Regarding water, it is hard to study precipitation maps, etc and plan based on that with the new realities in unusual weather, droughts, floods etc attributed to climate change. What appears to be a perfect spot this year could be a disaster the next. Also, don't overlook govt, Corp, or military projects and instillations that could possibly have a negative impact or pollution issues: is there fracking nearby? Keystone Pipeline? Coal mining? SmartGrid infrastructure? It seems to be getting harder and harder to find land that won't be potentially ruined by something beyond your control.
 
Chet Haggard
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I would have to suggest Missouri, more specifically southern Missouri or the area around Lake of the Ozarks. The land is affordable, the taxes are low, certain places have very little zoning laws and building codes. The state has long agricultural tradition and the people seem willing to support their local farmers. The weather isn't extreme in comparison to many other affordable states (Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Washington, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota). I have done a lot of research into relocating and Missouri seemed like the safest bet, I think in this unstable world you need to make your decision based on a long term low population density approach. I would Suggest checking out Joel Skousen's book Strategic Relocations and the website alt-mart.com . Personally I would avoid the entire east coast states, California and Oregon even though they are wonderful states, The desert states I would also avoid. This pretty much leaves with the a few of the western states and the heartland and out of all those Missouri is the least extreme. my crew will be moving out there soon and will be starting 50 plus acres permaculture farm, I hope more people will follow suit to Missouri.

to anyone you reads this I hope you have a wonderful day.
 
Matt Stoltenow
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I was at my inlaws a month ago and noticed that they had a new coffee table book called "Strategic Relocation" by Joel Skousen. I paged through it for 20 minutes or so and I thought it was a pretty thorough analysis of the US. He covered topics I never would have thought to consider and I'll probably be going through it in detail in the near future.

Here's a link to Joel's website Strategic Relocation

Good luck with your search!
 
Nathan James
Posts: 8
Location: Missouri ozarks
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Hello folks I'm new to this "forum and permaculture altogether" but I am the proud owner of 80 acres in the ozarks of southern Missouri and am wanting to share and learn of experiences of others hopefully near me please help me get started! I will be glad to try to answer questions the best I can about our great state for whoever is interested. Thanks!
 
caleb wardlaw
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I sure like seeing all this Ozark talk. Normally I would tell a person that the Ozarks are full of ticks and are terrible, but as several of you know it is a great location--plenty of water, fuel, year round grazing and a relatively low population density. If it is to be filled I hope permaculture folks do it. We have been farming here now for about ten years with greenhouse, gardens, a spring, cattle, poultry, bees, meat goats, hair goats, milk goats, mushrooms. If I can help anyone with info about the area let me know.

P.S. I think the Ozarks should be a separate region from the Midwest. We have very little in common with the corn belt.
 
Alder Burns
pollinator
Posts: 1374
Location: northern California
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My partner and I are selling our land in central GA which we had started to set up for permaculture. 40 acres, fully fenced, three small cabins, 3-4 clearings totalling ca. 8 acres, well on site. Plenty of firewood, some harvestable timber, small bamboo stand, a few perennials and useful trees, several open rain cisterns and small pond.... Permaculture, farmers' markets, and such like are starting to catch on in the area....
 
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