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2 acre project

 
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Hey guys this is my first post but i have been looking to start farming a 1.9 acre field to the right of my home as a little gomestead to keep some hobby livestock to care for as pet and show animals just for fun.
The fields currentky under the care of my uncle who owns all of the surrounding land and rents it to beef farmers and helps with the day to day care of their herds
My main dream has always been cattle but of course 2ish acres isnt really enough as far as i can tell (complete Newby only ever kept poultry for the last 10 years)
I live in ireland where i have never even heard of a mini jersey existing on the island so my next thought is 2 dexter cows which id hope to keep 2ish goats and maybe a mini donkey for my mother and little sister who love them.
The way the land is layed out is theres a small 0.15 ish plot out the back which could hopefully be home to a pair of kunekune pigs, which leads into a very small area in which id build on a small 8x8ish meter barn which would have a small area to its right which would open onto the main field which i coukd split in two or three if it would maintain the soil better.
The land is very high quality very green grass etc and id love to plant some trees for shade and maybe build a pond and an orchard to maybe keep geese in to keep the grass down while protecting the trees
I dont know if any of this would work or if i can even put in the work but its been an idea floating around my head for years now and i just wanted to ask the pros weather it would work or not )
Thanks im advance for any replys
 
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This all sounds wonderful!  
 
pollinator
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Location: Málaga, Spain
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Good luck, Ben.

I happen to have listened recently to Geoff Lawton talking about this. He said no matter how small your acreage is, you can rotate your cattle. Just make 12 divisions with the same size, and move your cattle every month to the next lot (assuming your grass grow equally every month, otherwise, adapt the design). Your divisions are roughly 500 sq meters each one, it should be enough for a few animals. You can tell how much cattle you can have by watching how much grass is left in the lot when the month is over. It's recommended that at least 1/3 of the grass is not eaten before moving, for preventing bare soils. Portable fences, portable shack and fresh water is all they need. Instead of shacks, you can let a few trees grow for shade.

Even if you aren't producing grass yet, moving the cattle is a good idea, since it will help fertilizing the lots, preventing over compaction.
Sepp Holzer has his cattle fed on wild grass, even with toxic and poisonous herbs. He told in a book that he watched an ill cow that recovered after eating a plant that is supposedly poisonous. The cow ate it as if it was medicine. Animals know better than us what they need to eat, as long as they have eatable edible grass, shade and fresh water, they should be fine.

Please, tell us a little more about your design, maybe we can give you more ideas if we know what your strategies are.
 
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Hi Ben,

Welcome to Permies.
 
pollinator
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Ben, tell us more please?
- where are you
- are the fences good
- what trees will work best
- steel or timber barn
I am curious.
 
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Welcome to Permies! (You are in danger of getting too many ideas now, along with plenty of encouragement!)

Surely there are folks in your area/region or climate with a similar situation with solutions you can copy and use? Perhaps they have blogs. Networking in person will be great if you can manage it.

If you haven't already started watching homesteading/animal tending videos, start learning from them now! Best of luck and don't give up on this great dream, just take it step-by-step!
 
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