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Alternatives to rice / winter wheat / barley / rye

 
Dave Quinn
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I have used the no-dig method with mixed results but it worked sort of OK with potatoes although the spuds were small and there weren't many of them they tasted good.

I am hoping to get some land soon where I would like to use one-straw methods, but in a region where rice is not a 'normal' crop. The area is like Soutwest Engalnd with plenty of rain and reasonable sun.

I like the idea of rice intermixed with winter wheat/ barley/rye , but does anyone know of a similar mix suitable for northwest europe/UK?

Anyone tried method with alternatives and had good results ?

Thanks

 
Marc Troyka
pollinator
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Posts: 357
Location: East Central GA, Ultisol, Zone 8, Humid
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Well, any combination of summer and winter grains that will grow in your area should work fine. For the summer, you might try buckwheat and/or corn, and for the winter wheat, rye, oats or whatever should work fine in your area. I haven't had the chance and don't have the space atm to try a similar rotation, so I can't really speak from experience. I would definitely use a deeper rooted legume than clover, though, or preferably a mix of things (ie residual cover crops).

As for no-dig, generally you have to use deep/thick rooted crops first to break up the soil, add biomass and pull up minerals. A good mix of cover crops can do this in 1-2 years.
 
Terri Matthews
Posts: 468
Location: Eastern Kansas
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Don't oats do well in your area? If so I would try to work that in.

I know rice really loves heat. Well, either rice will or will not work for you.

With your overcast climate, you might want to see if working in peas would work for you also.

I cannot double crop in my area, as the growing season is too short and the late summer is too dry. Though I might try again this summer. Maybe.
 
Alder Burns
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Posts: 1331
Location: northern California
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Broad beans or favas! I'm having good luck with soaking them overnight, inoculating, and poking the seeds just under the surface or the sod, at the right season (fall here, when rains start) Once they get up a bit they seem to be growing up and over the usual winter weeds and grass....
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1355
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Garlic, Beets, daikon radish.

Pretty much anything in the onion/cabbage/beet family.
As for legume fava/broad bean.

In fact here is a really good list for you.
http://perennialvegetables.org/perennial-vegetables-for-each-climate-type/cool-maritime/

I might check and let you know which ones are high calorie or carbon mulch (weed suppressant)
Ok here is a little bit more info for you.
http://growbiointensive.org/60%2030%2010%20Clar%20GM%202%2006%2011%2022%2006.pdf
http://growbiointensive.org/grow_main.html
 
Brenda Groth
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Location: North Central Michigan
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i guess a good question would be WHY.. what are you planting the grains for...animal food, commercial, people food, etc.

I was planting some grains for small grain use for just our home, and then I realized ..hey..I'm on a low carb diet, why am I planting grains.....now IF I AM planting them for the chickens that I plan to buy in the spring (If i ever do)..then that is a good reason..but otherwise WHY am I planting them?

plant what you'll use or your animals will use or you can sell
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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