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Mustard bad for cover crop?

 
J. Cardina
Posts: 19
Location: Zone 7A, Comox Valley, Vancouver Island, Pacific Northwest, Canada
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Hello everyone!

I keep reading that people use mustard for cover crop / green manure purposes on ecologically minded information sources however I also keep reading that mustard "inhibits weeds" on the more botanical type information sources.

I want to plant a wide variety of seeds for generating healthy living topsoil on a former lawn area but I'm concerned the mustard might negatively affect some of the other stuff I'm planting.

Is this an issue or not worth worrying about?

(The tentative list is: Alfalfa, crimson clover, phacelia, white clover, buckwheat, common vetch, oats, daikon radish, yarrow, comfrey, alyssum, dill, fennel, mustard)
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
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Some mustards are allopathic but that's when there in mass patches. And IMO that's usually on disturbed sites where they are healing the soil. I have mustards growing in all my polycultures and wouldnt have it without them.

Mustards are known to hinder harmful nematodes in the soil. There great dynamic accumulators. Eatable in more than one way.
 
Craig Dobbelyu
pollinator
Posts: 1250
Location: Maine (zone 5)
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forest garden hugelkultur
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I've never had a problem with mustard. They do inhibit nematodes so they are a good preceding crop for things susceptible to nematode attack. They've always done well in my poly-cultures.
 
Judith Browning
Pie
Posts: 5543
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
260
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
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We plant lots of mustard for all of the above reasons and I haven't noticed a problem. I sometimes plant it really thick before tomatoes and then cut off at ground level when I plant. Right now it is growing along with some of my herbs, arugula, anise hyssop, oregano, parsley, feverfew, cilantro, etc. and all are fine
 
Noah Figg
Posts: 57
Location: DFW Area, Texas
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I grow mustard heavily interplanted with other things and I haven't noticed any problem compared to before I started growing them. I find it to be a great easy biomass producer that is prolific in seeds. I would be interested to know any information you find out about mustards effects on remediation.
 
J. Cardina
Posts: 19
Location: Zone 7A, Comox Valley, Vancouver Island, Pacific Northwest, Canada
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Thanks everyone. I said "remediation" but I may have used the term incorrectly, what I mean is that it's a pretty barren area with the only topsoil being what is immediately attached to the grass with sandy rocky dirt underneath so I'm trying to build up the topsoil and healthy organisms that go with it. I've heard mustard is useful for that purpose amongst others.
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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