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Figs for Drying in the Pacific NW

 
Posts: 153
Location: Orgyen
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I live in Oregon and I love to eat figs. I especially want to grow enough figs at my farm so I can begin drying a big stash for winter use. So far, I've got an older fig tree that looks a lot like Desert King, a green-skinned variety that produces well, but the fruit is not very flavorful and it is not good for drying. I also planted a Petite Negri, a natural dwarf variety in my main orchard/food forest last year, but it never ripened the crop of figs in time before winter weather arrived. I'm hoping this tree will ripen a big crop of fruit this year for drying. I also have a Negronne fig in a big pot that I will be transplanting into the orchard this spring. Anyone else out there grow figs, especially for drying? (I'm also interesting in exchanging or buying cuttings for propagation.)
 
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Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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Check out this link for quite a few PNW figs. http://www.onegreenworld.com//index.php?cPath=1_27
They will list on the website which ones are good for PNW.
I am not too sure which ones are good for drying though.
 
gardener
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Location: Cascades of Oregon
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Burnt Ridge Nursery might be a place to look. They are in Oregon too.
http://www.burntridgenursery.com/searchprods.asp
 
steward
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Location: woodland, washington
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Robert Ray wrote:Burnt Ridge Nursery might be a place to look. They are in Oregon too.
http://www.burntridgenursery.com/searchprods.asp



Onalaska, Washington. close enough, though.


I really like Desert King figs when they're totally ripe. too juicy to dry, though. the problem you're running up against is that fig plants thrive in our climate, but our fairly variable growing seasons aren't terribly reliable for ripening fruit. microclimates can make a big difference here. south facing hill might be good. if that's not an option, south sides of buildings are good. creating a sun trap with plants or earthworks can help. a rubble wall to the north of a tree would help.

root restriction is a tried-and-true method for increasing fig fruit production. lining the planting hole with rubble will do it, as will using a spade to prune the roots annually or every couple of years. plenty of other ways to achieve that, too.
 
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