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SOS House overhanging stone foundation

 
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Hello all, I have put a 30' yurt on a stone foundation and am in quite the pickle..
The yurt seems to have settled and is overhanging the stone wall foundation in the back.

The foundation in sitting on 8inches of crushed stone, wrapped in filter fabric with a 4inch perforated pipe in the center. The stone wall sits on this rubble trench sort of deal, the stone wall is about 20-24" wide at the base, and narrows up to 8inches at it's smallest at the top in a few spots. On general the tops 10-12inches. The wall is 12inches above grade and probably 2ft below.

There are many things I wish I'd known to do differently. There is no water barrier or break between the stone and wood. I literally just construction glued wood pieces to the wall and set the yurt on it. The yurt is at least held down though, I tied the top of the walls aircraft wire to 13 loops of rebar embedded in the middle of the stone wall.

It's been up for a year now, and everything appears to be holding together. But the overhang is clear to see. I can jump around on the wood that's overhanging and nothing budges but I'm worried it'll continue to move.

Suggestions? Is there anyway I can stop it from getting worse? Or reinforce the overhang?

There’s currently no floor tying it together. The floors about a door lower than the yurt wall/top of the stone wall. It’s just foam over sand and a vapor barrier. We thought maybe we could frame a wood floor across what is basically a hole in the ground, to tie the walls all together. I’m sure that would help but not necessarily solve the problem.
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gardener
Posts: 641
Location: 5,000' 35.24N zone 7b Albuquerque, NM
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Interesting problem Amber. I have no experience with yurts but I do have experience with scissors jacks as well as wooden accordion hooks.
So when I look at your photo (47EB38F9-AE82-48E9-9D8A-23C9D0A8B955.jpeg above) and see the vertical support 2 x 6 (or maybe it's a 2 x 4), I wonder; if that vertical support had more length (or booster blocks at the bottom of these posts) would that extension raise the height of your yurt and thus reduce the circumference so it would fit onto your foundation?
 
master steward
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I'm thinking along the same lines - the yurt probably increased slightly in diameter by decreasing in height. However, I'm wondering if the solution might not be some wide straps and turnbuckles near the bottom, middle and top of the walls to crank it back to its original diameter.

Is this a commercial yurt? If so, were the instructions followed carefully as to supporting wires etc? Does the company  have any suggestions?
 
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Maybe try pulling the yurt wall in with a ratchet strap or come along, and pin it in place from the outside with extra blocks and fasteners? Really hard to tell what’s happening from the pics, but it seems like it should be a relatively easy “fix”. I’m wondering if it’s increasing in diameter due to the scissor effect of the diagonal framework? Maybe some vertical jacking would help? Yurt people.. help out!
 
pollinator
Posts: 185
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA zone 6b
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IF spreading is in fact the issue, you're not alone in this problem. The Hagia Sophia in Istanbul suffered the same issue on its main dome (resulting in several collapses over the centuries), and the solution here is probably similar. There, they wrapped a massive chain around the base of the dome that holds the bottom circumference in tension, so the bottom can't spread, preventing collapse. If you manage to ratchet strap it back into shape re: Ted's suggestion, you could then wrap a rope or chain around the bottom to keep it in place.

-Daniel
 
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Location: Sierra Nevada foothills, 350 m, USDA 8b, sunset zone 7
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So the yurt's wooden frame is not attached to the stone foundation? If it's not then it would be natural that it shifted. I would drill the foundation, at least 40 cm down on 50 cm spacing and add some anchors using Hilti resin. Then you would attach the frame to the anchors. It would be better if the L-anchors were already embedded during laying the foundation, but it's too late. You would have to find or fabricate anchors in such a way that they can receive legs of the yurt's structure.
Is it a permanent structure or is supposed to be taken down at some point?
 
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