• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Nancy Reading
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • Jay Angler
stewards:
  • Pearl Sutton
  • paul wheaton
  • Leigh Tate
master gardeners:
  • Timothy Norton
  • Christopher Weeks
gardeners:
  • Tina Wolf
  • Matt McSpadden
  • Jeremy VanGelder

Likely solution to eliminating the plastic membranes on a wofati

 
pioneer
Posts: 463
Location: Russia, ~250m altitude, zone 5a, Moscow oblast, in the greater Sergeiv Posad reigon.
68
kids hugelkultur purity forest garden foraging trees chicken earthworks medical herbs rocket stoves homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Apparently, birch bark is waterproof and rot resistant. Treating and sealing it with birch tar might possibly improve these abilities. Perhaps larch or black locust planks can help segregate the birch bark from soil contact. Insights? Has anyone worked with birch bark? http://naturalhomes.org/permahome/birch-bark.htm
 
steward
Posts: 15110
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
4602
7
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've thought about this a little bit.  I think the problem would be that if the birch bark is buried, water can travel horizontally a lot easier.  So if you shingle pieces of birch bark like you would on a roof, I suspect the water will still wick through the gaps in the bark pieces and get through.  Especially in the flatter areas near the top.

You'd also have to be pretty selective to get bark without cracks or holes in it.  Tar would resolve that issue a fair bit.

Lastly, as the building settles and the dirt shifts during the covering process, I think the pieces would keep getting out of alignment.
 
Mike Haasl
steward
Posts: 15110
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
4602
7
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I should add that it is waterproof and very rot resistant.  I had a piece of birch bark in my compost pile for several years and it didn't degrade while everything around it rotted several times over.
 
Myron Platte
pioneer
Posts: 463
Location: Russia, ~250m altitude, zone 5a, Moscow oblast, in the greater Sergeiv Posad reigon.
68
kids hugelkultur purity forest garden foraging trees chicken earthworks medical herbs rocket stoves homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Awesome to know! So sealing it is a good idea. Maybe a layer of clay on top of the tarred bark would be good. Need to find out the traditional techniques for green roofs using birch bark.
 
Mike Haasl
steward
Posts: 15110
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
4602
7
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think the key difference between birch on a roof and birch in a wofati is that it's buried in the wofati.  I believe water underground acts differently from water running down a roof.

Wood shingles are fairly waterproof and for them to work on a roof I think they need to be a fairly steep pitch.  Flatten them out and water gets through.  Cover them with 6" of wet soil and the water can take its time getting through.  I think it would be the same with birch bark.

I do hope it is a viable option and my beliefs/assumptions are incorrect.  
 
Myron Platte
pioneer
Posts: 463
Location: Russia, ~250m altitude, zone 5a, Moscow oblast, in the greater Sergeiv Posad reigon.
68
kids hugelkultur purity forest garden foraging trees chicken earthworks medical herbs rocket stoves homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The Scandinavians are one step ahead of you, there. They use birch bark as the underlayment for a living roof.
 
Myron Platte
pioneer
Posts: 463
Location: Russia, ~250m altitude, zone 5a, Moscow oblast, in the greater Sergeiv Posad reigon.
68
kids hugelkultur purity forest garden foraging trees chicken earthworks medical herbs rocket stoves homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
To be clear, sealing each joint with birch tar or pitch would be my method. That would hopefully eliminate any capillary action of the kind you’re worried about.
 
I didn't do it. You can't prove it. Nobody saw me. The sheep are lying! This tiny ad is my witness!
Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
https://permies.com/w/better-world
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic