Win a copy of Bioshelter Market Garden this week in the Market Garden forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • James Freyr
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • r ranson
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Joseph Lofthouse
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
gardeners:
  • Dan Boone
  • Carla Burke
  • Kate Downham

Resources for zones 5A thru 6A

 
Posts: 18
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've been doing some deep digging on the web and have come up with some awesome sources for those living in PA and/or USDA zone 5A thru 6A. Most of this information comes courtesy of the Penn State Agriculture Extension.

First check your local college to see if they have an agriculture department, if so; chances are good that they have an "extension" and will have many articles and helpful resources for your region.

Now, on to the good stuff:

First up is a link to the Purdue University New Crop Resource page http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/default.html# Where they are dedicating this site to the restoration and use of heirloom and ancient/non-traditional agriculture fruits, veggies, nuts etc. - Includes the famine foods page with thousands upon thousands of non-traditional foods (Ie: perfect for permaculture perhaps?)

Next is a slew of links to the PSU extension:

http://extension.psu.edu/ag-alternatives Fact sheets on the left will provide much information on things such as agritainment, aquaculture, raising cattle or even quail or elk and much more.

http://extension.psu.edu/start-farming/fruit-berries/so-you-want-to-grow-fruit... This here is a news article about growing fruit in PA, with great resources listed in the article.

http://extension.psu.edu/susag/resources Section with resources for sustainable agriculture (I think this fits in nicely with permaculture)

http://plants.usda.gov/java/altCrops?entry=initial State search that gives data/fact sheets about each plant available to grow in that state, sortable and searchable by over 20 different crop attributes. Click the "state search" link on the left side bar.

This one: http://www.centerforagroforestry.org/pubs/index.php comes from Missouri University and has many many resources listed as well. Especially linked for the nut growing information.

http://extension.psu.edu/start-farming/news/2010/growing-nuts-in-pa Article about the opportunity to grow nuts in PA.

That's about all for me today. I realize that much of this is not strictly food forrest/permaculture but I'm just starting out and for someone in that position I think this info is very useful.

What do ya'll think?
 
pollinator
Posts: 442
Location: Pennsylvania Pocono Mt Neutral-Acidic Elv1024ft AYR41in Zone 5b
27
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Jeremy, Great info resource, already learned some interesting stuff. A big Thank you from the Poconos, Pa.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2416
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
153
forest garden solar
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
For even bigger list of plants that you can grow check out raintree or onegreenworld.
http://www.onegreenworld.com//product_info.php?cPath=4_107&products_id=1411

Here is a few zone 6 citrus (bitter orange and thomasville citrange). With a little help they might make it in your neck of the woods
http://mckenzie-farms.com/photo.htm

Even if some of the tree that you see are not listed for your zone, search for a regional vendor they will have a cold hardy one.
For example these upstate NY guys. http://www.sln.potsdam.ny.us/
 
Rick Roman
pollinator
Posts: 442
Location: Pennsylvania Pocono Mt Neutral-Acidic Elv1024ft AYR41in Zone 5b
27
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
S. Bengi Wow, St. Lawrence Nurseries is amazing. I just found several hard to find plants and it's a northern climate, local nursery to boot. Thank you!
 
Jeremy Laurin
Posts: 18
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for the other sites, they are very good. Here is another I found this morning: www.wildflower.org - search, sort by perennial and then read about the plants to find lesser known potentials for your forest. Like the common pawpaw.
 
Posts: 644
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks and welcome, Jeremy. I hope you continue to post more.
 
Posts: 9
Location: Missouri
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Very useful, thanks!
 
Beauty is in the eye of the tiny ad.
Heat your home with the twigs that naturally fall of the trees in your yard
http://woodheat.net
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!