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Temperate edible plants for wet places/shallow water

 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 690
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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While there are some interesting plants to grow in wet places or shallow water when you're in the subtropics or tropics there is not so much choice in colder climate.
We have dug some ponds, but they only receive rainwater runoff and might be dry at some stages. I am searching for edible ideas. We get up to -5C
So far I have:
Oenanthe javanica (hope spelling is right, identification is important there are poisonous plants in this species)
Gingers (some varieties survive here)
Canna edulis (not really productive here)
Mints (thanks I've got enough)
Lebanese cress (grows like a weed)
Cranberries
Sagittaria (haven't harvested yet)
Water chestnut
calamus (I don't know for sure which strain I have)
What else could I plant?
 
Matt Smith
Posts: 181
Location: Central Ohio, Zone 6A - High water table, heavy clay.
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I've got a fair bit of wet area to contend with as well, I've been compiling a (hopefully) comprehensive list for our site in 6a. I've got it on my home computer and will try to remember to post it tonight.
 
Jordan Lowery
pollinator
Posts: 1528
Location: zone 7
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Have you considered plants that are not eatable but useful? Coppiced willow or other species will give you material for baskets, wattle fences, bean poles, and more. Plants that produce great biomass in wet areas can be chopped and taken to infertile places as mulch.
 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 690
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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I use comfrey for that. Willow is a big no no here, forbidden weed.
 
chrissy bauman
Posts: 131
Location: Sunset Zone 27, Florida
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i cant remeber if lotus can take the cold.
what about waterlilies and the humble cattail? i thought waterlilies were edible, but might be wrong there. i;m going to put both in my future pond.
 
David Goodman
gardener
Posts: 496
Location: Zone 9a/8b
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"Willow is a big no no here, forbidden weed."

FORBIDDEN? I'd take that as a challenge, not an obstacle. Stick it to the man!

Elderberries are a good wetland species. You might also talk to your local native plant society and see if they have a list of species. Then, take that list and find out what's edible via further searches.

 
David Goodman
gardener
Posts: 496
Location: Zone 9a/8b
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One other thing: I've heard that gingers don't mind moisture during the growing season, but after frost when they go dormant, wet soil will rot them.
 
Tyler Ludens
pollinator
Pie
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Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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Here's another listing of edible moisture-loving plants: http://www.pfaf.org/user/cmspage.aspx?pageid=79

 
Bobby Clark Jr
Posts: 25
Location: Lamar County Mississippi
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Not sure about water lilies being edible but all parts of the lotus are. The native yellow lotus will survive very cold weather, I don't have the specs on hand how cold but I'm thinking below 0 F.
 
Alder Burns
pollinator
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Location: northern California
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Wild rice!
 
Angelika Maier
Posts: 690
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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Apparently the seeds for wild rice must be really fresh. Do you know a source for really fresh seeds other than in the wild (I can't fly over the big pond to gather some seeds)?
 
Alder Burns
pollinator
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Location: northern California
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I did not realize you are not in North America. Here there are companies that will ship wet seed. Whether they would ship overseas, through who knows what customs, etc. is a good question. Perhaps someone on this list lives near where some grows and can slip a few into an envelope to you? And I would bet that someone, somewhere in Europe (assuming that's where you are) is growing it, even if it's in a botanical garden. Finding it might be the challenge. I've pilfered many a seed, and cuttings also, from such places. Permaculture to me means useful plants worldwide are the property of the people!
 
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