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Chainsaw sharpening gadget

 
pollinator
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For decades, I've used a fairly simple file jig for sharpening my chains. Clamps onto the bar. Theres a nut which you trickily adjust with a pair of pliers to switch the file angle for sharpening one row of teeth, then for the other.

I saw a very short video about this gadget, which would eliminate the step of adjusting that nut for the correct angle of approach for the two rows. Looks like an interesting system. One trade name this gadget is sold under is Emery, but there's more than one trade name. It appears simple to use, and the precise sharpening angle (for cross-cutting) appears to be ensured for absolute precision.

In Canada, Amazon is currently selling the kit for $40.  61% of purchaser feedback either 4 or 5-star, with 53% being 5-star.

But has anyone here used one? if so, what do you think of it?
CS-guide.png
[Thumbnail for CS-guide.png]
 
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Hi Joel;
A cool-looking tool.
As you say there are many different brands that all appear the same.
Here is a link to one https://www.amazon.com/Jowxi-Chainsaw-Sharpener-Portable-Sharpening/dp/B0BZ4F3F9H/ref=psdc_9425917011_t2_B0BZJBZR8X?th=1
My question is the fact they do not mention the file size, one would guess they are 7/32

I have always sharpened by hand.  Believe me, you sure can tell that I'm not that great at it!
I have tried the Dremel attachment and the older file guides and they take too long.
I keep going back to just doing it by hand, one tank of fuel and touch up the chain. Unless of course, you are cutting in rocks and dirt...
While researching, I came across what looks to be a better guide than the old ones.
Here is a link.
https://www.amazon.com/Pferd-17304Pferd-Chain-Sharp-Filing/dp/B0046VN5Z6?th=1
This looks like something I might want to try.
Perhaps someone has tried this tool out.
31O5HdfAbdL._AC_.jpg
[Thumbnail for 31O5HdfAbdL._AC_.jpg]
 
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I have that blue one you posted, it works fairly well. Takes maybe 20 minutes to sharpen the chain and I definitely go from saw dust to ribbons once its sharp again. The outer-metal things sit inside of neighboring teeth to keep it on angle.
 
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Thomas, that appears to be a copy of one made by Stihl. Someone here has posted about one, maybe Opalyn Rose? I haven't used one, but it does seem handy in that it's claim to fame is that it files the depth gauges and cutters simultaneously so they are always in agreement. Though that would give one no control over how aggressively the teeth cut, but for the average person that's probably just fine.

I have not used the one in the OP, but I have seen a similar one that used a carbide rotary file in a similar aluminum jig. The videos looked convincing. I have used a chopsaw style sharpener most of my life, but find myself using a simple file with a guide or even without more and more these past few years.
 
Joel Bercardin
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thomas rubino wrote:
My question is the fact they do not mention the file size, one would guess they are 7/32


See those four bits at the top of the pic? To me, they look like they're diamond-coated. The selected bit is spun by a crank, and gradually moves in to the depth of the abrasive. Probably the four bits coincide with the common range of needed "file" diameters.
 
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Appears to be a cheap chinese knockoff of a $125 timberland.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0_4sKBo9r_w

Here’s what “derek75116” wrote:

“I ordered a timberline with out even knowing that the knockoffs existed. Freeze this  vid at say 12.05 (timberline). Even with this tighter tolerance USA made product I wasn’t happy with the amount of slide anvil unsupported in the channel.(little over 50% ) , and this is on a chain that has nearly all the tooth life on it. Once you sharpen to the end of the chains life only 30% in channel !
What I did is punch out the roll pin and turn both swing arms around.
This improved things in two ways.
1) A more consistent back stop reference, (vertical surface vrs a sloping surface)
2) Allowed far more channel engagement of sliding anvil, thus more precise and consistent sharpening.

I run small saws with 4mm chains so I just got away with modifying my timberline this way. Larger chain operators might find minimum extension on anvil still isn’t enough to allow sharpening on relatively new chains.

Without knowing better I honestly thought Timberline made a mistake in assembly of this tool on my particular build.It  makes no sense to have an angled surface for a reference?!  Perhaps the angle helps to keep the chain pushed down to the bar so it doesn’t rise with respect to the reamer ?

Which ever way the backstops are used Timberline should lengthen the channel (one side) and slider by half inch . Then dial in the stroke / roll pin relationship for real application usefulness across sharpening life for various chain sizes.

‘A great quality tool but falls over on the execution’”


This reviewer recommended Granberg, Stihl, 2 in 1, or Chicago Electric bench grinder.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BzmKwxfqjjQ&t=15m25s

 
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