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when did honeybees immigrate?

 
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I have a possibly ridiculous question:

I started a community garden in Austin, TX and one of my gardeners protested putting in a bee hive because European Honey Bees are not native. Do we know when European bees arrived in the US? Is the name European just a description and not really an indication of origin?

btw, we are putting in the bee hive anyway.

Thank you.

 
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
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European settlers brought the western honeybee (apis mellifera) to the Americas. So they are non-native strictly speaking; but they've naturalized over several centuries now.
 
steward
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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The "European Honey Bee" was brought to North America in the early 1600's.

They have been in the U.S. long before tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, zucchini, potatoes, cantaloupes, corn, watermelons, okra (and hundreds of other fruits/vegetables). If he wants to be an ass about the bees not being native, give him Hell about his selection of vegetables.

 
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YOU  ALL  MISSED  THE  BOAT  ABOUT  THE  QUESTION!!!
Here is the real answer!!     :-)

Bee_Archives.jpg
[Thumbnail for Bee_Archives.jpg]
 
pollinator
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This appears to be an old thread, but I believe I remember from “Guns, Germs and Steel” that honeybees were seen by some western Native American tribes as forebears of pestilence and death. This was from associated European diseases carried by settlers, and one might assume other threats brought by them. For the most part, an interesting take away was how plants and animals settlers culturally depended upon preceded the people, including peaches and pigs, cattle and clover, as well as honeybees.
 
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