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Cherry trees damaged in winter, need help!  RSS feed

 
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I planted a couple of anatolian cherry trees last winter but they were ravaged by animals down to 3-6 inches of wood. They were both 4-5 feet tall by the end of summer. Now one seems to be growing a lone skinny branch and 2 leaves recently appeared and the other has grown numerous leaved shoots from the base. Do these sound like they're recoverable? I'm a beginner and don't know what the hell I'm doing really. I'll post a couple pictures later today. Thanks.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1453
Location: northern California
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"Where there's life there's hope". As long as the original trees weren't grafted, the sprouts from the base should come true. If they were grafted, you might be able to graft the sprouts if you can find a source of the scionwood.....
 
Posts: 39
Location: Savannah GA
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i know this probably won't help, but on a recent hike cherry trees were the most damaged and torn tree on the mountain. seems like less exposed for them the better?

good luck to them like AB said. "if theirs life theirs hope". maybe they'll turn out squattier easier pickin trees
 
Bob Steve
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My camera is finally working again.

This is it... I imagine I should trim it but I'm no expert on what should be done. The other tree looks pretty much normal again.

 
Posts: 1947
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
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I would be thinning those stems to one or two - you basically want to keep the strongest, most vertical, leaders to form your new trunk. Given that you know you have critters in the area I'd also invest in a sturdy tree guard - we have used spiral wrap ones to good effect to protect trees from sheep grazing.
 
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Not really sure what an Anatolian cherry is, but the pictures looks like a Nanking cherry, Prunus tomentosa. Perhaps they were used as a rootstock or?
 
Bob Steve
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It's suppose to be anatolian white cherry imported from Turkey. I don't have any info on how they were grown...but If they ever produce fruit I'll find out what they really are. This one looks like a bush but used to look like a normal tree...the other one looks like a tree again now.
 
I agree. Here's the link: https://richsoil.com/wood-heat.jsp
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