• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Wooden plate rack  RSS feed

 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
Posts: 10003
Location: Portugal
923
bee bike books duck forest garden greening the desert solar trees wofati
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My other half made me one of these a few months ago.



It's fitted directly above the kitchen sink and the plates go straight into it after washing, so it doubles as a drying rack and a cupboard. It suits my rather allergic-to-housework tendencies...
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
Posts: 10003
Location: Portugal
923
bee bike books duck forest garden greening the desert solar trees wofati
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
And here's a shot I took of it a few days ago.

Can anyone spot the house dragon?

 
Deb Rebel
garden master
Posts: 1802
Location: Zone 6b
187
books cat fish food preservation greening the desert solar trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ran across this thread. Lovely dripdry and store rack. Made my guess on where the little House Dragon is... did I get it right?
thumb-547340_BurraHouseDragonGuess.jpg
[Thumbnail for thumb-547340_BurraHouseDragonGuess.jpg]
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
Posts: 10003
Location: Portugal
923
bee bike books duck forest garden greening the desert solar trees wofati
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You got it right!

Here's another shot...



 
Deb Rebel
garden master
Posts: 1802
Location: Zone 6b
187
books cat fish food preservation greening the desert solar trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What wood did he make the rack of, and is it finished in any way? How is it holding up?
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
Posts: 10003
Location: Portugal
923
bee bike books duck forest garden greening the desert solar trees wofati
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Some kind of softwood, probably pine.  Nothing fancy or expensive.

It's finished in a water-base pine-coloured exterior quality varnish.  Probably not the most ecological, but it's holding up very well.  It looks pretty well as good now as when he first made it.

Maybe I should photograph it again, but I should probably dust the cobwebs off it first.  That house dragon has been slacking and letting the spiders get a foothold...
 
Jessie Twinn
Posts: 21
Location: Central Highlands, Victoria Australia
1
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
David Holmgren, co-originator of permaculture, uses the same system in his house. It's rather brilliant on both space and housework saving IMO and we will be implementing it into our new house when we build.
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
pollinator
Posts: 575
Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
67
bike dog forest garden urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
love your house-dragon!
Once I made such a plate rack myself. But I am not very good at wood works, so it isn't there anymore.
 
Deb Rebel
garden master
Posts: 1802
Location: Zone 6b
187
books cat fish food preservation greening the desert solar trees urban woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Burra, is this what your house dragons look like?

Hemidactylus_turcicus.jpg
[Thumbnail for Hemidactylus_turcicus.jpg]
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
Posts: 10003
Location: Portugal
923
bee bike books duck forest garden greening the desert solar trees wofati
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oh that's adorable.  Ours aren't friendly enough to sit on our fingers.  They still consider us to be newcomers to their house. 

Here's a few photos - I think they must be a different species.











 
Deb Rebel
garden master
Posts: 1802
Location: Zone 6b
187
books cat fish food preservation greening the desert solar trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Burra, they're the same thing. And all of them are adorable. Wish I had something to eat spiders, crickets and other insect vermin that liked my house to live in.

Still like your rack a lot. I have a few good pallets I could sacrifice to make a holder like that. Thank you.
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
pollinator
Posts: 575
Location: Meppel (Drenthe, the Netherlands)
67
bike dog forest garden urban
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Many years ago (around 1977) we had a 'tokkeh', an Indonesian gecko. That's a much larger house-dragon. First we kept it in a terrarium, but it did not stay there. Both the tokkeh and the crickets we fed it escaped ... which caused troubles with neighbours (we lived in a large old house devided in rental studios in those days).
 
Amit Enventres
Posts: 458
Location: Ohio, USA
29
dog fish food preservation forest garden fungi solar trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Awesome! Previous to us remodels rendered the dishwasher spot as too small, so we turned it into a really large dish rack. Seriously helps me enjoy dishes. That and water sprayer and spray soap mixture. I rinse, sprits, walk away, rinse, move on.

More amazing is this whole concept of a house dragon. We have like no lizards or snakes here, but plenty of centipedes and spiders. Did you let them go or are they native there?
 
Burra Maluca
Mother Tree
Posts: 10003
Location: Portugal
923
bee bike books duck forest garden greening the desert solar trees wofati
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Amit Enventres wrote:
More amazing is this whole concept of a house dragon. ... Did you let them go or are they native there?


They are completely native and were living in the house for decades when it was empty.  We took great care to not drive them away when we renovated the place, and left little hiding places unplastered around the back of the stone lintels above the windows so they'd always have somewhere familiar to hide.

Here's one in slight shock watching the old roof being removed. 



I love the little critters. So much less trouble than other pets, and surprisingly little poop.  Plus they eat flies.
 
This parrot is no more. It has ceased to be. Now it's a tiny ad:

the permaculture playing cards
richsoil.com/cards


  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!