I just dropped the price of
the permaculture playing cards
for a wee bit.

 

 

uses include:
- infecting brains with permaculture
- convincing folks that you are not crazy
- gift giving obligations
- stocking stuffer
- gambling distraction
- an hour or two of reading
- find the needle
- find the 26 hidden names

clickity-click-click

  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

Smoked Bacon without Nitrite  RSS feed

 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Posts: 3433
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
209
chicken dog food preservation forest garden fungi tiny house toxin-ectomy trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Anybody has a recipe to make smoked bacon without nitrite?

It is possible to make air dried bacon without it, but I yet have to find a recipe for smoked bacon that does not require it. The idea is that since smoking is anaerobic, there are chances that botulism will develop during the process. Using nitrite prevents the growth of the spores.
 
Eric Thomas
Posts: 110
Location: Northeast Oklahoma, Formerly Zone 6b, Now Officially Zone 7
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Presume you mean without using any nitrates at all, i.e. sans celery juice powder?
 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Posts: 3433
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
209
chicken dog food preservation forest garden fungi tiny house toxin-ectomy trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
yes, no nitrate, saltpetre, celery seeds, etc.
 
Eric Thomas
Posts: 110
Location: Northeast Oklahoma, Formerly Zone 6b, Now Officially Zone 7
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My son is a chef, specializes in charcuterie, we were discussing this the other day. Found this... Home smoked bacon
It's on our short list of must-try.
 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Posts: 3433
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
209
chicken dog food preservation forest garden fungi tiny house toxin-ectomy trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks for the link Eric.

Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall in his DVD pig in a day does not use nitrite, but his recipe is for air dried bacon. In dried air charcuterie, their are no chances of botulism to develop because the anaerobic conditions are never present. This is not the case with smoked charcuteries where the smoking time is anaerobic and at low enough temperatures that botulism could develop (according to Ruhlman and Polcyn), so that is why the nitrites are used. So I am a bit concerned to just leave them out unless I am certain that I create conditions where botulism cannot occur.

I wonder if creating an acidic condition on the surface during smoking would be good enough. If I remember correctly, botulism cannot develop if the pH is below 4.6 (don't quote me on that one).
 
Eric Thomas
Posts: 110
Location: Northeast Oklahoma, Formerly Zone 6b, Now Officially Zone 7
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well, the last time I sat in Bio 2 class Richard Nixon was president and my hair was a little longer...so don't quote me either!

Moisture content (water activity) has a lot to do with the ability of the botulinum spores to grow. Check page 6
CDC on Botulism

Temperature, pH, competition from other microorganisms, moisture, and oxygen. Salt brining, either dry or wet, will reduce the internal moisture, think speck or prosciutto, but these products are air dried for months. Then give it a smoke, which should reduce the moisture level even more. No moisture, no botulism (& fingers crossed).

It's unfortunate that nitrites are presumably bad for us because they're really effective at preventing botulism spores from growing and from the spores producing toxin (note the differences in an additional 100 micrograms/gram of nitrite levels). Effects of nitrites on botulism




 
R Scott
Posts: 3363
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
32
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I can't remember where I got the recipe but I thought it was the farmsteadmeatsmith video. Cured in the fridge below 40 to stay relatively safe. Then smoked for flavor more than preservation.

 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Posts: 3433
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
209
chicken dog food preservation forest garden fungi tiny house toxin-ectomy trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Eric, I looked at the reference and I have even more questions.

To prevent the spores to produce the toxin, you want 1) Low temperature 2) Low pH 3) Low water activity (10% NaCl solution) 4) High level of oxygen 5) Food preservative (nitrites) 6) Competing micro-organism.

However, the document says that some strains of the spore can grow at temperatures as low as 3.3C (37.94F). Now, in practice I am not sure what a 10% NaCl solution would be. I mean, if you have a brine, you could measure the concentration, but in the case of a dry rub, I am not sure how one would do that. I am not sure the competing micro-organism would be very happy in the smoke, although I can see that as being useful for other types of charcuteries.
 
John Polk
steward
Posts: 8019
Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
289
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here is a good ref site for anything sausage and/or smoked:

Wedliny Domowe
(That is the English site - they also have one in Polish.)

They have around 200 sausage recipes from just about any country that makes sausages.
Great resource for anybody that loves pork, or any other preserved meats.

No-Nitrate-Smoking.JPG
[Thumbnail for No-Nitrate-Smoking.JPG]
 
Eric Thomas
Posts: 110
Location: Northeast Oklahoma, Formerly Zone 6b, Now Officially Zone 7
1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Adrien, a 10% solution would be 100 grams salt in 900 grams of water. Looking at folks that make prosciutto and the like, they pack it for days or weeks depending on the size of the specimen. I suppose the idea is to let it weep water until it stops, you can't get the moisture content any lower without applying heat (or air drying in low humidity) after that.
 
Always! Wait. Never. Shut up. Look at this tiny ad.
Permaculture Playing Cards by Paul Wheaton and Alexander Ojeda
https://permies.com/wiki/57503/digital-market/digital-market/Permaculture-Playing-Cards-Paul-Wheaton
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!