• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
garden masters:
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • thomas rubino
  • Bill Crim
  • Kim Goodwin
  • Joylynn Hardesty
gardeners:
  • Amit Enventres
  • Mike Jay
  • Dan Boone

I.D. Tree in Indiana?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 41
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Can anyone help with this one. Sorry about the slight blur

20131115_143607.jpg
[Thumbnail for 20131115_143607.jpg]
 
pollinator
Posts: 167
Location: NE Ohio (Zone 6a, on the cusp of 6b) 38.7" annual precip
27
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi Brad--

Can you tell us the following:
- Where are you / the tree? Looks northern temperate US, am I right?
- Leaf shape?
- Looks like your tree is near to a wet trench / gully (where the grasses are) -- is that right? If in a wet spot, is it doing well, there?

Thanks -- love the plant and tree ID puzzles!
Mariamne
 
Brad Cloutier
Posts: 41
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Mariamne Ingalls wrote:Hi Brad--

Can you tell us the following:
- Where are you / the tree? Looks northern temperate US, am I right?
- Leaf shape?
- Looks like your tree is near to a wet trench / gully (where the grasses are) -- is that right? If in a wet spot, is it doing well, there?

Thanks -- love the plant and tree ID puzzles!
Mariamne



I lol because we've been stalking this piece of property for 6 months now but its not ours YET! This is in northern Indiana just a few miles from the southern tip of lake michigan. There was no leaves on it so I cannot say what the leaves looked like. I would not call this a wet spot. It is on a slope about halfway down, but the slope is not really significant.

I should say that it did drop its leaves rather early. I believe this was the first one to drop. My dad tells me black walnuts drop their leaves pretty early.
 
pollinator
Posts: 2392
82
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The trunk looks a little light to be a black walnut. Looks more the color of a hickory trunk. You didn't get up close to it to see what kind of nuts (if any) it dropped? Those green hulls of the black walnut make it pretty hard to mistake for another tree when you see them all around the base.
 
Brad Cloutier
Posts: 41
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
agreed on the green hulls of walnuts. we saw none whatsoever.
 
steward
Posts: 4400
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
262
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Your really giving us a challenge here Brad.
If you could get a clearer, closer shot of the bark and branches that would help.
You might have to wait until spring to get some leaf and or flower shots.
 
Brad Cloutier
Posts: 41
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
i just don't want to get arrested
 
Brad Cloutier
Posts: 41
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well, received confirmation from a lumberjack that this is a black walnut. thought i'd share
 
Posts: 14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Imho as an arborist I would say that it is either an autumn blaze or sugar maple. Its hard to say for sure.might be a silver maple.
Look on the ground under it to see if there are any seeds that look like a half of an airplane prop.
A tree that size should just be starting to develop a rougher texture in the bark at the lower parts of the trunk.
Buds in spring should be redish in color and are one of the first to start blossoming in spring.
If leaves are yellow in fall its a silver maple.
If orange red mixture of color in the leaves then it could be others.
It will make a lovely shade tree for you.
Best of luck with it.
Brian
 
Brian Murray
Posts: 14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Didnt notice you already had it looked at.
If you would like to double check his opinion cut a fallen limb.
if it has a black center its a walnut,if whiteish to pale tan its a maple.
 
Posts: 18
Location: Kansas City Kansas
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Need leaf pics alternate or opposite branching ?
 
Posts: 25
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I guess walnut too. Very thick branching looks like its built to hold heavy fruits.
 
Posts: 64
Location: Missouri
16
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi all,

It is awfully tough to tell what that tree is with the picture. I'm a Forester with lots of Mid-west experience and I'm pretty darned sure that is no walnut. Its almost certainly not a Black Walnut (Juglans Nigra), it might be a european, but it is no North American Juglans or Carya. The steep angle of the branches kind of point towards a faster growing species, but that is hard to say in an open grown/manicured setting. The most diagnostic way to tell walnuts/butternuts from other trees is to break a twig laterally and check for a chambered pith. In your neck of the woods there are very few other woody plants with tree form that would have that. I'll refrain from hazarding a guess without some close up pics of branching pattern, leaves or buds.

http://www.uwgb.edu/biodiversity/herbarium/trees/jugnig01.htm (click on the "twig" picture along the top row)

Just m 2 cents. Hope it helps.

J
 
steward
Posts: 1793
Location: Western Kentucky-Climate Unpredictable Zone 6b
104
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't believe this is a walnut . My guess is also a maple . The dappled light to medium grey color pattern on the lower branches is a clue. What say you all to the possibilty of this being a hackberry tree ?
 
And then we all jump out and yell "surprise! we got you this tiny ad!"
Tomatoes! Ha! Anyone can grow that. Amaze your neighbors, grow your own shirt!
https://permies.com/wiki/92731/fiber-arts/Homegrown-Linen-transforming-flaxseed-fibre
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!