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How Wolves Change Rivers

 
pollinator
Posts: 304
Location: Montana
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The study summarized in this video is very near and dear to me. The intricacies of nature are so beautiful, so many possibilities lie within. This is a short video on how the re-introduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park had a positive effect not only on the ecosystem of the park (a trophic cascade) but also on the hydrology of the landscape. I don't think the narrator knows that the "deer" are actually elk, but that's a small distinction.



Lets make this just the very start of human catalyzed ecological and geological regeneration
 
Posts: 107
Location: eastern panhandle of W.V.
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hugelkultur forest garden fungi trees books chicken
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I have often wondered if we do enough to make up for the carnivores we displace in a given landscape, what our part in the guild we play in addition to designer. This made things clearer for me esp after hearing how the deer were displaced from browse areas by the wolves and how that allowed a greater diversity in plant and animal growth. I think we forget to include ourselves in the design as top of the food chain carnivores and what we would contribute if we harvested the available native animals on our properties.
Here in WV the deer are way overpopulated and there is nothing growing in the understory except some ferns and picky things. Hunting season is fall/ winter only so that the deer are on alert and in hiding during that season only. Makes me wonder if we hunted monthly if that would keep the deer in hiding and away from some areas of browse... Would that also help to keep them from gardens in zone 1? What if zone 1 also became the hunt zone for us? (Seems as though it is for the wolves!) Could we do away with fencing?
Become the wolf...
 
pollinator
Posts: 4665
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
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hugelkultur forest garden fungi books bee greening the desert
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Another thread here too. Pointing out the cool link to rotational grazing.

https://permies.com/t/33132/desert/wolves-change-rivers-rotational-grazing
 
Posts: 34
Location: Chesapeake Beach, MD Zone 7b
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I just saw this video from a link on Facebook. Fortunately, I have a habit of checking to see if something was posted before so I don't repost and I found this one.

Anyway...it deserves a bump. Wolves are permaculturists!
 
Posts: 9002
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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The red wolf of coastal BC gets most of it's food from rivers and estuaries. They spread nutrients to higher ground. I believe that it is the most aquatic sub species.
 
permaculture is a more symbiotic relationship with nature so I can be even lazier. Read tiny ad:
Devious Experiments for a Truly Passive Greenhouse!
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/paulwheaton/greenhouse-1
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