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Hugelkultur ROAD

 
R Scott
Posts: 3305
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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He calls it a corduroy road, but it is a hugelkultur remediation of a wet boggy section of a driveway/path. By the time the wood breaks down, it should be a taller road with good dirt and root stabilization.

I have a couple spots I could try this, but I don't have the wood to start with.
 
allen lumley
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Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
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books fungi hugelkultur solar wofati woodworking
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This is one mans observation and your milage may vary But, I have seen Where a corduroy road was placed at the end of an arm of A lake, and Eventually
over several score of years the road Kinda firmed up but always had a dip of several feet in the center where the culverts were !

The county boys tried to widen this one lane corduroy bridge and the material slid off of the sides and dumped into the lake slide of of ether side of the original
corduroy road creating two new Crescent shaped islands parallel to the original road, A large crane with drag lines was brought in to remove the several feet of
muck islands, as the 'stone Amendments kept sinking to china !

After much time the attempt to widen the 50 ' of cow path was abandoned and the sag is back in the middle , total cost to the county was a million dollars +

If A corduroy road is made of slow rotting soft woods and gets quickly buried and covered so that there is no Oxygen to rot them original corduroy roads can
go on for ever but they will never firm up ( Except for a short time during dry periods !) and will need lots of Attention!

I have no idea Where this is, but for anything heavier than a Quad wheeled vehicle this is not as practical as Draining EVERY TIME it is possible ! Big AL !
 
Hester Winterbourne
Posts: 110
Location: West Midlands UK
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allen lumley wrote:
If A corduroy road is made of slow rotting soft woods and gets quickly buried and covered so that there is no Oxygen to rot them original corduroy roads can
go on for ever


Too right - look at these!
peatland excavations in Ireland
 
Ce Rice
Posts: 98
Location: Zone 8-9
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I don't think I would call it a hugelkultur road, but here in the US, we call everything hugelkultur, so....

I think the way this was built, as seen in the video, it should work fine for use 10-20 times a year, but to me, seems that weekly, much less daily traffic would bust those 'punky' sticks into mush, and before too long you'd be dealing with gettting stuck again.

What would be an ideal fill material to fill in the spaces, cracks and give the grass and weeds a chance to set in some firming root structure? a clay mix? sand? gravel? I personally just don't know what would be best. Compost maybe.
 
allen lumley
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Location: Northern New York Zone4-5 the OUTER 'RONDACs percip 36''
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Submerged Timbers : There is a Museum located very close to '' The rude Bridge, where once was fired the shot heard round the world '' The museum was in
private hands during an early Preservation attempt of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to repair the Bridge.

From the stream bead a foundation log was removed that supported the shoreline structure of one side of that bridge, The local farmer, sawed that log to make
a mantle for his fireplace, You can go there today (Lexington and Concord ) and cross that bridge, and go to the museum and touch that log that probably was
the 'Sill Log'' for the bridge and underwater for ? 150? years?

Its been over 30 years since I was There so excuse me if I'm a little off Big AL !
 
Joe Braxton
Posts: 320
Location: NC (northern piedmont)
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A similar approach to road building dates back to at least 1829 when George Stephenson built a rail line across Chat Moss in Greater Manchester, England. The line is still in use today, so it can't be said it won't last.



However, the biggest challenge was the 6.5-kilometre (4-mile) crossing of Chat Moss, a
2,000-hectare (5,000-acre) stretch of peat marsh. Giving evidence for the opponents of
the first Bill, the civil engineer Francis Giles remarked that 'no engineer in his senses
would go through Chat Moss'. The original intention was to drain a tract of marsh and
stabilise it by the tipping of spoil. When this failed, the solution was to create a 'floating'
bed of larch trunks and branches, covered with brushwood, heather and moss, and
topped with a layer of earth, sand, shingles and cinders. The construction of this stretch
of track took three and a half years


http://www.mosi.org.uk/media/33871623/theliverpoolandmanchesterrailway,construction.pdf
 
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