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Fukuoka VS Hugelkultur

 
Karen Crane
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Just got the book "Sowing Seeds in the Desert" By Fukuoka ( he is the "One Straw Revolution" guy.
He mentions that he tried burying branches ,etc and found that it took lots of work and din't think it was worth it.
Anyone got thoughts on that?
 
James Colbert
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Are you sure you read that correctly. My understanding is that he first tried using straw with disappointing results then he tried carrying in wood from an outside source which worked well but was labor intensive finally he settled on planting fast growing trees in the orchard so they could be buried without having to haul the wood in. I believe his preferred species was black wattle/ acacia mearnsii.
 
Burra Maluca
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I think that in Sepp's case he had a load of fallen trees and the heavy equipment to bury it. That's a whole other scenario from having to fetch wood in from an outside source. As in most things in permaculture, it's a case of using what you have to best effect.
 
Jordan Lowery
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Karen is right he does mention that growing the trees and burying them was a lot of work, and that building deep soil with plants was a better goal.

James is also right, in his earlier books he did mention using acacia to do this job.
 
Bryan Jasons
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Holzer and Fukuoka generally have different views regarding work; Fukuoka seems to like Low labor, low risk, low reward techniques like scattering seedballs and Holzer has a preference for lots of direction and labor and big projects, though that might be a generalization on my part. Their approaches aren't mutually exclusive in my opinion; I like to have active projects and passive observation going at the same time, all the time.
 
Peter Ellis
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It may be worth noting that there is no one best way. Each situation is different, and there may be many approaches that will work, one of which may match up 'best' with the combination of farmer, environment, market, and so on.

Both Fukuoka and Holzer emphasize the importance of observation before action. Holzer is a pretty assertive fellow who seems to go about making things happen once he is ready and has decided what should be done. Fukuoka seems to have been more along the lines of letting things happen, rather than making them happen, and making choices that made for best results with minimum efforts.

Each approach seems to have worked for them, and neither would likely be happy following the other's path.
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