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FEELER--12 acres,+pond, 40" from Albany, seeks unpaid permies willing to rough it for a summer  RSS feed

 
Joshua Myrvaagnes
pollinator
Posts: 563
Location: Massachusetts, 6b, urban, nearish coast, 39'x60' minus the house, mostly shady north side, + lead.
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Putting out a feeler to see if there are people who would be interested in this situation:

land share best describes this, but with some strings attached and some added benefits.

We have 12 acres of mostly wooded land, and there is more woodland around that, some owned by one of our members. On slope, tons of water. Big, sometimes roaring creek and pond (about 50' in diameter, I'd guess). We are a spiritual community gathered around a shamanic practice, and run an educational non-profit about this practice. The land is sacred
to us, so we will never sell it or give it over for development. Any work you do on the land will serve generations. (And hey, if an apocalypse strikes, that could include you!)

It's 40" drive from Albany, in Rensellaer County, near Cherry Plain National Park. East of Albany and somewhat south. 40" to Pittsfield in Massachusetts.

We would love to see it cultivated and flourishing, to supply our food for our gatherings and students, to raise animals, "connect us" to the earth, have closer feedback systems for us experientially as eaters of food, and build sustainable shelter. Bonus poinst if you can get West African plantains to grow in this climate. Or moringa.

I at this time can't speak for the whole community, so this is not a definite thing, only a feeler. However, I'm in the Land Stewardship Circle for our village, and if there are people who match with what I believe we're in need of, then this is a real, concrete possibility.

Here's the catch:

--you must tent (there are no shelters available but some unheated cabins that will be needed for students coming to the land; you might be able to build a more permanent structure but that would require negotiation and I can't guarantee that).
--there would be no guarantee of any pay whatsoever. Our non-profit does not have any money to pay anyone for this at this time.
--if you can't raise some crop to sell in the time you're there, you won't get money out of this, and if you can't raise some food you won't get to eat that either, you'll need to find a way to feed yourself.
--you must leave when it gets cold in the fall, absolutely no guarantee of any kind of continued stay
--only two or maybe people consistently on the land with you, and a family across the way, for company;


Here's the plus sides:

--You could stay as many months as you are comfortable on the land (it gets cold early in the fall), you could come and go as you please.
--you could use the land any way that you want, as long as it's in balance with nature, approved of by the village as a whole, serves the village's teaching mission
--it's pristine land--most of it uncultivated for two or more decades, no lead in the soil, as far as we know no toxic pesticide residues left in it; almost nothing ever built on it, except the mill from centuries back
--tons of water flows over the land
--three natural springs
--powerful and comforting spiritual energies on the land (if that's something you believe in, that that would be a big plus for you; a Dagara man came to our land who was not involved in our community and he wept and said he felt like he was at home!)
--strong commitment from the land owners (us) to stewardship, ecological integrity and sustainability, respect for nature's balance, and longetivity. Work you do on the land will never be undone by someone for short-term profit, the land will not be sold, even if Earth changes cause the economy to go haywire we'll still tend the land, we are committed to it for two generations
--plenty of space--12 acres belong to the village, but there is more next to it that you might be able to use too
--a drive running up most of the acreage provides access for large machines/trucks
--farm next door could supply some manure and hay if you made them an offer, who knows they might let you work out some raw milk, but they're an old family farm, I don't think they're organic
--lots of trees are on the land now, and many of them beech trees which we anticipate will bear seeds soon, perhaps this year
--active creek and already existing mill pond/ice pond (it used to be a mill, and you could certainly turn it into an active aquaculture setup in, I'd guess, an hour? I'm no expert)
--community some of the time: people will show up on weekends and I imagine you would be welcome to participate in some of the workshops, certainly in the village life of the kitchen and inspiring conversations and rendezvous, chats by the fire at night
--if you felt inspired to join our community, anyone is welcome to join, it just means going to lots of boring meetings and doing our weird ritual things.
--if you've got money, you could buy the house across the way (been on the market for three years I think, last listed around $200k I believe, and it has its own pond too and is a beautiful log cabin)
--the three people who may be on the land all the summer are really cool people: me (I'm awesome, really empassioned about working with nature's intelligence, a lover and an uplifter), R., our tingansob, keeper of the Earth shrine, really passionate about Dagara spiritual practice, gave his whole life to that; and A, backbone of our nonprofit and a real --mover and shaker.
--solar showers (very basic) you can use with creek water.
--I'm QUITE sure you can heat yourself with a rocket mass heater and no one will trouble you about it. You can also make an open fire. It's the country! woohoo!
--It's QUIET. Tree frogs. Crickets. Bard owls. Occasional coyotes. The rush of the creek all night.


I believe financially and in terms of immediate benefits, this would be ideal for someone who can do aquaculture and arboriculture, knows what they're doing, and has a market for fish already lined up; OR has a job that is OK with them showing up how you'd look if you sleep in a tent and don't have running water, and then wants to do some long-term investment in permaculture after work, gaining experience and getting to eat the fruits of their labor and benefit from the health-giving properties of seriously fresh, hyper-hyper-local food. And someone for whom freedom to live by their values and ideals is a tangible benefit, giving them a greater sense of health from the get go. Compare to gardening in your yard if your landlord isn't sold on permaculture as a concept.

We need people who are responsible and looking to contribute as well as receive, and to be honest about what they will and will not carry out. If you just bummed around on the land all summer and did nothing, as long as you're happy we're happy, but of course you wouldn't get monetary or food rewards.

It might be possible for you to apprentice with the nano-brewer across the road.

Again, this is only a feeler, nothing is set in stone as of yet.

If interested, please contact me and let's have a convesration to get to know each other and see if it makes sense for me to go forward and bring this up with the Board.

Thanks for your consideration.

In community,



Joshua
 
Joshua Myrvaagnes
pollinator
Posts: 563
Location: Massachusetts, 6b, urban, nearish coast, 39'x60' minus the house, mostly shady north side, + lead.
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PS my email is inspiring tutor boston [at] gmail [dot] com. Thanks.
 
Joshua Myrvaagnes
pollinator
Posts: 563
Location: Massachusetts, 6b, urban, nearish coast, 39'x60' minus the house, mostly shady north side, + lead.
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PS I thought of another big pro and another big potential con:

the con:
it's really a big plus if you're on the same page as us , if not you would be miserable. That is that you would need to run every major decision by nature's intelligence, and also have the blessing of the community. This is a non-religious question, but requires an open mind and genuine experiential inquiry. It may be a curvy path.

the pro:
fish pond is I'd estimate 30' in diameter. That would be, I estimate, 5,000 gallons, assuming it's a foot deep. If it's deeper, 7500, 10,000? With a stream already feeding it fresh, oxygenated water. From what I understand about aquaculture, this is a huge resource, and is easy, low-hanging fruit.

Thanks again.
 
Burra Maluca
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Adrien Lapointe
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