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Looking for perennial early blooming, bee/butterfly attracting plant that doesn't spread

 
Posts: 65
Location: Oregon (zone 7b), 31.3 inches/yr rainfall
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I am looking for suggestions for some good perennial flowers that are early blooming, bee/butterfly attracting that doesn't spread much/at all, but will come back each year. I don't want to worry about it going to seed or having to divide, etc. I want to plant them in my orchard, so an even bigger bonus would be if they provide some other benefits
 
steward
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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Regional selections of native wildflowers should suit you fine.
Most distributors have half a dozen or so regional mixtures.
These are usually both annuals and perennials. (The annuals should reseed themselves.)
Most of these mixtures have early, mid, and late blooming species.

A huge advantage to these mixes is that they provide food and habitat for the native pollinators.

An example of one of the many distributors: http://www.edenbrothers.com/store/wildflower_seed_mixes.html

 
pollinator
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Location: northern California
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Seems like a lot of spring bulbs might fit your requirements….the adapted ones will be perennial, and bloom early enough to be just about the only thing out (and so be quite valuable to bees, etc.). Most go dormant in the summer and need no supplemental water. A few have poisonous bulbs (such as the daffodil family) and so are reputed to be repellent to gophers. Look around and see which seem to be growing effortlessly in your area and start with those….
 
pollinator
Posts: 3171
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even Soil:SandyLoam pH6 Flat
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Check out this list.
http://www.hgtv.com/gardening/spring-bulbs/pictures/page-7.html
 
Posts: 7
Location: Maritime Pacific Northwest, Zone 8
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(Greetings, I am a complete newbie here ...)

How about Pieris?

Don't know about it for butterflies since I don't see any in early spring here (western Oregon, z8).

In this bee document from OSU (http://extension.oregonstate.edu/lincoln/sites/default/files/documents/bee_comparisonchart.pdf), it lists Pieris japonica as among the favorite food of mason bees. Bumble bees seem to like it very much as I observed in my front yard. I plan to add this plant to my orchard.
 
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