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ISO hazelnut tree seeds

 
Jen Van
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Hello,

Anyone know where I can find hazelnut trees or seeds in the Twin Cities area or a reputable online source?
Thanks for any help, jenny
 
Troy Rhodes
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Whatever you get, make sure it's resistant to Eastern Filbert Blight. I had a couple iterations die, and I think that's what did it.

My newest ones seem to be doing well. They are from Raintree and specifically state they are blight resistant.

hth
 
R Scott
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Location: Kansas Zone 6a
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Badgersett.com

He has hazel and chestnut already adapted to your climate and disease resistant.
 
Jen Van
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Thanks so much to both of you!
 
John Saltveit
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Hazelnuts seeds are also called hazelnuts or filberts. It is the nut.
John S
PDX OR
 
Michael Qulek
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Here's where I bought most of my hazelnuts. Burnt Ridge has a lot of quality stock in the kinds of oddball trees that homesteading types like me want.
http://www.burntridgenursery.com/nutTrees/index_product.asp?dept=54&parent=
Blight resistance is mentioned in the descriptions. Note that different varieties are needed to pollunate each other, and the legends for each variety mention what pollunates what. I have also sprouted store-bought hazelnuts and have a few of them in my orchard also. They don't show any symptoms of blight, so I'll assume they came from blight-resistant parents. I also have seedlings planted from store-bought chestnuts. Those are also coming along nicely, without any signs of Chestnut Blight, though they aren't bearing nuts as fast as my grafted Chestnuts (typical).

Please note that layering or rooting is a standard method for propagating these varieties, so you might save some money by buying a few high quality varieties, then rooting cuttings yourself from your own growing stock.
 
Jen Van
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Excellent information from everyone! Do deer love them? I have some hungry critters around here....
 
Troy Rhodes
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Deer will eat -almost- any plant if they are hungry enough, and that plant is available.

Some of the websites suggest they are not the preferred browse for deer, but are more vulnerable when young and tender.

I pretty much don't plant trees any more unless they get the protective collar of 4" corrugated drain pipe. I had some left over, so it's paid for. Cut off a hunk as long as you need, slip it over the young tree and you're done.


troy
 
Dave Lodge
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Location: New England
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Deer don't prefer the leaves but will eat it in their browse. The nuts are a good food source for them though. Squirrels and jays will plant them for you if you let them.
 
leila hamaya
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Location: northern northern california
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here is a link for hazelnut tree seeds

http://www.treeshrubseeds.com/searchresults?k=corylus&match_type=0

this particular website has a lot of awesome tree seeds =)

i've been able to sprout some seeds myself, tho i dont get always a high germination rate- some of them come up. soon i am going to try to gather some of our wild california hazelnuts i found growing at high altitude here, hopes some of them will sprout by overwintering them next year.
 
Victor Johanson
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Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
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R Scott wrote:Badgersett.com

He has hazel and chestnut already adapted to your climate and disease resistant.


Last time I checked with them, they don't sell seeds. They do sell eating nuts, but strongly recommend against planting them, because they keep the promising seed to grow out. They did say to keep checking back, though. I should do that...
 
John Saltveit
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Filberts and hazelnuts (same thing) are native here and we produce almost all of them in US. Squirrels are the #1 serious problem for growing them here. They will steal all of them. Having a cat is probably a good idea if you want them.
John S
PDX OR
 
Jen Van
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I truly appreciate all the tips! I had to post this after the deer talk...I've been using various methods to keep them away for this season until my saplings and develop a bit more...mama and fawns last night...
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norm graham
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Go to a LOCAL state forest.....find the nut tree you want. Look and make sure no one is looking (it's illegal to remove the tree nuts from state land), and then pick up a few nuts. Or along a road, etc.
Doing this locally, will help slow any disease/bugs moving around the country.
Another thing you can do, is go to the local soil and water commission, and find when their annual tree sale is. (I've bought a thousand trees this way).
I plant 60-200 trees a year....(Mostly because I own 300 acres, and for several years before I bought the land valuable trees were all logged. Thus, there are broken oak trees of 3 feet in diameter, in the woods.......but....ZERO oak trees left in the woods, and the squirrels have left the area...lol.. It will take ? years to fix this problem. All the tiny oak trees that get going, get over browsed (the deer and rabbits eat them), and even after nearly 10 years, the problem is slow to fix itself. Also true of pines, but these grow unexplainably fast on most of my land.
-- do a ph test on the soil...make sure it's in the range of the tree you'd like to plant.
Look at the trees growing in the area. Trying to plant a tree that does not belong, will often result in failure. Planting a tree near beavers is a waste of time, they will use the sapling in their dam.
We spend entirely too much effort trying to get a nut to germinate artifically, just go with a digging bar and plant 50 of the nuts. Do not plant them too deep, they need to freeze during the winter. Plant nut trees on a slope where they get plenty of water. If you see blueberries growing out of control in an area, then this area has a high PH, do not try to plant a tree that will not like that.
 
norm graham
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Look towards your local Soil and Water annual sales, or a neighboring county. States do not like you moving plants too far around the country.
Diffrent counties have diffrent deals, and you might find a better price in a neighboring county for 10 vs 100, if that's all you want to plant...etc.
 
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