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permaculture group

 
Posts: 42
Location: wellsville, utah
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so, i'm starting a permaculture group in my valley.

anyone have any ideas? i've started a facebook group (though haven't put anything on it really)
and have contacted a community center for the use of their building.

i'm going to go on the radio to promote the thing, and set a date for the first get together.
that's the deal there, the first one.
if it's crap nobody will come back!
so i'm hoping for idea's of what to do.
i'm thinking a simple presentation of what permaculture is, and how it can apply to cache valley (in utah)
without sounding like a democrat (i know, what i did there, with the stereotyping, and the negative vibe, please just try to get past it) as it is a very conservative area.
i guess i could go for the food storage is a doctrinal principal in the lds church approach, well, all that aside,

what should the content be? what information can i present to make it appealing to people who have never heard of it, or thought of anything like it before?

*braces for an epic downvote* oh... wait, this isn't reddit.
 
gardener
Posts: 1948
Location: PNW Oregon
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I would appeal to the people's good sense and reason - permaculture is all about observing and working with natural systems to achieve maximum benefit.  This is great news!  Market it as such.....

So show some simple applications that people can easily employ.  For example, do not talk up compost in and of it's self.... many people have bought composters and become burned out using them.  Talk compose and how one can start an easy no-fuss pile in corner of their yard - no extra expense.  I did this with my grandmother, she was the dumper mostly, except for the lawnmower boy, and I would help spread it in the spring - easy!  You want faster compost - bump in an area with a few chickens to rotate and add their contributions, also easy!  No debates on the 'perfect' compose just a get out there and do-it approach.

Latest thing:  It's a new craze to turn one's yard into a urban cottage farm - show 'em how to keep a small flock of birds (most cities allow at least two chickens or ducks) and grow a few seasonal and perennial vegetables.  Talk up the benefits of not using chemicals to remove weeds and pests, but instead using a couple of lawn ducks and white vinegar. 

Marketing: Use a few key phrases like -
improve your soil the natural easy way.
Solve common pest problems.
Employ a few animals to work for you!
Reuse and save big $
Make your property work for you instead of the other way around.
Etc.......

Good luck on your endeavor 

 
                                            
Posts: 59
Location: Bellevue, WA
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and really, playing up the LDS doctrine of having supplies on hand can't hurt.  I used to live in Utah and the mormons I was friends with all took that very seriously and, honestly, just how seriously they took it helped nudge me along the path towards permaculture and emergency preparedness. 

It's one thing to have dry packaged stocks on hand, but to have living, self-replenishing stocks as part of your property is a whole different, and better, thing.  Promoting perennial edibles and fruit/nut trees as a living supply in trying times that can contribute to their plates now would likely resonate with some folks.
 
Posts: 124
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Meetup.com is great. That's how the permaculture community in my area is organized
 
pollinator
Posts: 4437
Location: North Central Michigan
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good luck, any promotion of better use of the land should be a benefit to your entire community..wish i had teh desire to get one started here..but for the time being i'm just too busy
 
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