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A partially cow driven building method  RSS feed

 
Emerson White
Posts: 1206
Location: Alaska
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Looks like it wastes a lot of concrete, but still looks cool.

Link
 
Joel Hollingsworth
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Location: Oakland, CA
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Lost vacas casting? 

What an amazing idea. I'm not sure there are many instances where it's the best way, but it's another line in the ecosystem of ideas. I'll have to remember it.
 
                          
Posts: 94
Location: Colorado
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my thought was a storm or root cellar, possibly using the same method, if wanting a nicer inside, lay some plywood down to form the inside but use the bails to support it until the pour is complete,  use rebar to support the roof,

but using some thing like this could mean the difference of having it or not,
 
Joel Hollingsworth
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A couple more thoughts:

A haystack would produce a much, much stronger structure than hay bales, due to the naturally domed shapes they can take on: no strings to hold tension=no rectilinear masonry-breaking spans.

It's probably a very good idea to have the chimney and other ventilation channels in place before the pour, both because they'd be difficult to retrofit in, and to keep the hay in good shape until it can be eaten.

It might be more sustainable to follow an incremental construction method, rather than calling in a couple mixer trucks for one big pour. The haystack could be shaped, covered with plaster, then stucco, maybe some wire reinforcement, and a few more coats of masonry. Perhaps papercrete or similar could be included somewhere in the layering process, to improve insulation value. Bales would be great as scaffolding, though, or perhaps earth could be built up around the structure as the last layer is added up to the next increment of height. I realize that many hours of trowel work can now be a lot less accessible than a few minutes of time with heavy equipment, but that isn't so everywhere, and might not always be so even here in America.
 
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