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mushrooms, mosses and lichens (some to ID) from our hikes, home and other places in the Ozarks

 
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Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Jen Fulkerson wrote:I'm so jealous, All the pictures are beautiful and interesting.  My wood chip have very few small whitish mushrooms and stuff that looks like yellow barf.


haha...we have the 'yellow barf' stuff also.....

I see you are in northern California...it's likely there are exciting fungi in your neighborhood?

It's so special how the lichens and mosses stand out over the winter and now are fading into the background with all of the spring greenery.  

I'm glad we have the opportunities to hike these mountains.  Now, the state and national park trails here are closed because of the virus...it is about the time we stop hiking for the season anyway because ticks and snakes are out.  Now we take a three mile walk on a gravel road out of town...not a fungus in sight yet
 
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Hey Everyone,

Absolutely love the thread - the photos are stunning! I run an Australian-based health website and we have a lot of great articles - one being a guide on the health benefits of Turkey Tail mushroom. A lot of the imagery we've had to use are pretty generic 'stock images' and some of the shots in this thread are just beautiful! Would there be any objections to me using a few of the images in our article and attributing back to the photographer? You can have a look at our article below Thanks so much!


Turkey Tail Mushroom
 
Judith Browning
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Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Darcy Ogdon wrote:Hey Everyone,

Absolutely love the thread - the photos are stunning! I run an Australian-based health website and we have a lot of great articles - one being a guide on the health benefits of Turkey Tail mushroom. A lot of the imagery we've had to use are pretty generic 'stock images' and some of the shots in this thread are just beautiful! Would there be any objections to me using a few of the images in our article and attributing back to the photographer? You can have a look at our article below Thanks so much!


Turkey Tail Mushroom



Hi Darcy, thank you and welcome to permies!

I did the photos and am fine with you using what ones you like, just keep the accurate label/ID with them....and maybe link to this site if possible?  I don't care about being credited.
I really appreciate that you asked though.

It's a great turkey tail article
 
 
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Location: N. California
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I didn't lie in my earlier post, I just didn't know.  I have 3 whiskey barrels I got a few years ago on clearance at Walmart for 10 dollars.  I didn't need them, but couldn't pass them up.  One ended up by the driveway and I put flowers in it.  The flowers always die.  In the hot months, which seems like half the year it required watering everyday.  I don't have enough time, motivation, or determination to water everyday.  In the fall of 2019 I decided to treat it like a hugel beet.  I soaked old chunks of fire wood, and sticks and wood chips for a few days in water.  I then placed the firewood, soil, sticks, leaves soil, wood chips, soil with compost mixed in.  I planted mum's I got on clearance and some pansy's.  I watered everything when I planted, and once a couple of weeks ago.  They were beautiful all fall and winter long. Not bad considering it was a very dry winter.  It was getting to hot for the pansy's so I popped in some alyssum and, petunia's about a week ago.  I noticed they needed some water and found the bonus of mushrooms.  Not a normal thing to find around here, so I'm happy to share my little surprise with you.
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